Showing posts with label Gorkha Regiments. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gorkha Regiments. Show all posts

Gorkha Regiment : The legendary badass warriors

6:45 PM
Writes Naba Raj Chetri

“Better to die than to be a coward" is the motto of the world famous Gorkha army, whose might and valour has transcended boundaries, but what do we really know about the gorkhas, lets try to find out.

Origins
Historically the term ‘Gorkha and Gorkhali” is derived from the hill town and district of Gorkha from where the “Kingdom of Gorkhasthan” expanded. The Gurkhas introduction to the British Army begins in 1814 during the Anglo-Nepalese war.Though the British were militarily successful, attempts to annex Nepal failed and the hostilities ended with the signing of the Sugauli Treaty. The British were so impressed with the Gurkhas fighting abilities, their loyalty and ferocity that they later encouraged them to volunteer. Gurkha troops then fought for the East India Company in its wars in the subcontinent.  The Gorkhas became an integral part of pre-independence British army. From then on, Gorkhas have been a part of Afghan Wars, Indian Rebellion of 1857, both world wars (More than 200,000 fought in both world wars, 43,000 of which lost their lives) and other United Nations peace keeping missions in Lebanon and Sierra Leone too.
British Gurkhas
The very first Gorkha regiments were raised by British to serve in British Indian army. After India’s Independence, six regiments, the 1 GR, 3 GR, 4 GR, 5 GR, 8 GR and 9 GR were retained in the Indian Army, while 2nd, 6th, 7th and 10th joined the Brigade of Gorkhas in the British Army. Another regiment was raised by the Indian Army, the 11 Gorkha, to accommodate the soldiers who refused to be transferred to the British Army.

Currently, the Indian army is indebted to the service of 40,000 brave Gorkha soldiers in 42 different battalions of 7 regiments. One of the most famous platoon of Gorkhas, 1/11 Gorkha Rifles is one of the most decorated with 11 vir Chakras, 2 Maha Vir Chakras, 3 Ashok Chakras and 1 Param Vir Chakra. The stories of its Param Vir Chakra winner Lt. Manoj Kumar Pandey are a case study in their glorious history of courageous war footings.​

Another famous battalion of Gorkhas is the third battalion of the 4 Gorkha Rifles which was instrumental in Operation Meghdoot in Siachen. The 8 Gorkha Rifles are also have a glorious past as they produced one of the only two Field Marshals for India – Sam Manekshaw. India’s current chief of army staff, General Dalbir Singh Suhag, is also from the Gorkha Regiment which is a testament of the most incredible services of Gorkhas.

The Gorkha Brigade
Facts:
i) Gorkhas has been instrumental in all Indian victories in every battle since 1948 till now.The character played by Ajay Devgan in the film LOC Kargil  (Capt. Manoj Kumar Pandey, PVC awardee) was a gorkhali of 1/11 regiment.

ii) Officers in the Gorkha Regiments of the Indian Army have to learn the Gorkhali language to be able to interact with their men in their native tongue.

iii) Recently a battalion comprising entirely of Indian Gorkhas was set up, this is the 1st time a new gorkha battalion have come up in 50 years. The Sixth Battalion of the First Gorkha Rifles (6/1GR), christened  "Kanchi Paltan" has been raised at Sabathu in the Shivalik foothills near Shimla, that houses the 14 Gorkha Training Centre.

iv) “If a man says he‘s not afraid of dying, he’s either lying or he’s a Gorkha.”This quote by Sam Manekshaw, Indian Army’s first Field Marshal, aptly describes what it means to be a Gorkha.

v) The queen has two personal Gorkha officers who directly attend official state and key events with the queen. They’ve been present in all state affairs since the Gorkha’s introduction during queen Victoria’s reign.

vi) Dalbeer Singh Suhag the current chief of army staff is also from the Gorkha regiment, he was comissoned in 4/5GR in 1974, and according to the traditions of the 5th GR wears his head gear with the strap below the lower lip. Other regiments wear chin straps below the jaw.
An interesting account need to be told here about the chin strip---
When the Gorkhas joined the British army they proved to be slight primitive in war, they always screamed and then charged at the enemies, which was harmful for launching surprise attacks. So the commander of a gorkha regiment asked his men to wear the chin strips under the lips, So that they would be reminded not to scream when they get into attack mode. The 5th Gorkha Rifles still maintains it.

The Khukri 
The Gurkha’s traditional weapon and all-around utility tool, is the powerful Khukri, an inwardly bent cross between a machete and a knife, measuring 18 inches and able to split a man’s head down the middle midway to the chest in one blow. Ghastly indeed. According to tradition, once drawn, the kukri demands blood, if not the enemy’s, then the owner’s will suffice. The regimental insignia of the gorkha regiment also consists of paired crossed Khukri.

The Khukri
Decorations
Gorkha Regiments are one of the most decorated regiments of Indian Army.They are considered finest soldiers worldwide..

Three Gorkhas has been awarded the highest military decoration "Param Veer Chakra" Which are most by any regiment of Indian army.In addition to this, various Gorkha Regiments have been awarded 33 Maha Vir Chakras, and 84 Vir Chakras besides 26 victoria cross. the British military’s highest distinction for valor,while 2,700 were awarded other medals in World War II alone. More recently, a Gurkha sergeant was awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross for single-handedly fighting off a Taliban attack to his base in Afghanistan.


Recruitment
More than 28,000 Nepalese from the hills strive to become a Gurkha every year to fill just 200 places. The selection process is said to be the toughest in the world and the competition is stiff. The ranks have always been dominated by four ethnic groups: the Gurungs and Magars from central Nepal; and the Rais and Limbus from the east, who live in impoverished hill villages.


Training
As part of their training, recruits are expected to pass several educational, language and fitness tests, among them running a 3-mile uphill course carrying 70 lbs. on their backs and doing 70 sit-ups in 2 minutes. After meeting the initial age, height, weight and schooling requirements, recruits go on to the second stage for English language training, maths, fitness and an initiative test. The third stage includes: 3-month language training, military skills, Western culture and customs, general weapons training and, of course, several fitness tests.


Stories
Stories of the Gurkhas bravery and skill abound have been well documented, such is the reputation of these hardy nepali hillsmen that stories of enemy fleeing their position upon hearing rumours of their advances abound.


During the Gallipoli campaign in 1915, in the thick of World War I, the Gurkhas gained immortal fame by capturing a heavily-guarded Turkish-held position with relatively few casualties. On the Western front, a Gurkha battalion fought until the last minute and to the last man at the Battle of Loos.

Recently in India, a retired Gurkha officer travelling on a train in India found himself in the midst of a massive robbery by a band of 40 bandits. When they tried to rape a young girl, the retired Gurkha unsheathed his kukri, killed 3 bandits, injured another 8 and sent the rest fleeing.

In Afghanistan, A Gurkha on a mission to kill a “high-value target” needed proof of his mission’s success in the form of DNA, swiftly decapitated the target and brought his head in as proof instead.

Diprasad Pun  a sergenant of the Royal Gorkha Rifles single handedly defeated 30Talibans who were storming the complex, he fired 400 rounds of Ammunition, used 17 hand grenadews and a Claymore mine before battering the last fighter with the tripod of his machine gun.

Cardozo's was a major of the the 5th gorkha rifles, his remarkable military career saw him losing a leg when he stepped on a landmine in the 1971 war. He cut off his mangled leg with his own khukri and told his Gurkha man: "Now go and bury it." Determined not to let the disability affect his career as a soldier, he later became the first disabled officer in the Indian Army to command an infantry brigade. The regiment which then had 750 personels then made 7326 Pakistanis surrender.

These brave soldiers are an asset to all the nations they serve, In India every year there is a tussle in the IMA as the top cadets try to get into this regiment of the braves. Courage on war front and innumerable gallantry awards notwithstanding, the aura of Gorkhas on the field demands immense respect and makes the enemy tremble with fear.


5 Gorkha Rifles officers out of 14 approved for rank of Lt General

7:30 AM
The Army has de-classified the promotion board results for the rank of Lt General and a major chunk of the vacancies for this particular batch have gone to officers belonging to the Gorkha Rifles.

As per details of the result accessed by The Indian Express, a total of 14 officers of the rank of Major General have been approved in the ‘Command and Staff Stream’ in which they will go on to Command a Corps each and then onwards for appointment as Army Commanders or General Officers Commanding-in-Chief of a command. Five officers out of these 14 belong to the Gorkha Rifles, though from various Gorkha Rifles regiments, and none from the Chief of Army Staff’s own regiment, the 5th Gorkha Rifles.
Gorkha Rifles
Gorkha Rifles 
The selection board for the Major Generals of 1981 batch was held earlier this month. Among the officers who have been approved for the rank of Lt General are Maj Gen SK Saini (Jat Regiment), Maj Gen AS Bedi (Garhwal Rifles), Maj Gen A Chauhan (Gorkha Rifles), Maj Gen JS Negi (Dogra Regiment), Maj Gen IS Ghuman (Brigade of Guards), Maj Gen PM Bali (Punjab Regt), Maj Gen Vijay Singh (Gorkha Rifles), Maj Gen SK Upadhya (Garhwal Rifles), Maj Gen Saranjit Singh (Sikh Light Infantry), Maj Gen YVK Mohan (Gorkha Rifles), Maj Gen AK Bhatt (Gorkha Rifles), Maj Gen Dushyant Singh 9Maratha Light Infantry), Maj Gen RK Jagga (Armoured Corps) and Maj Gen R Gopal (Gorkha Rifles).

The social media was soon abuzz with the list of officers approved and the fact that such a large number of Gorkha Rifles officers had made the grade. However, a senior officer from Gorkha Rifles said that Gorkha Rifles is comprised of seven separate regiments and that all individual regiments are different from each other having separate regimental centres and there being around 45 Gorkha Rifles units.

The selection board has also not thrown up name of any officer approved from the Regiment of Artillery in the general cadre for the command and staff stream. Earlier, officers from the Artillery and even the Corps of Engineers had been doing very well in getting command appointments in higher ranks and the present Vice Chief of Army Staff, Lt Gen MMS Rai, is from the Corps of Engineers.



Via indianexpress



First battalion of only Indian Gorkhas is born

8:40 AM
Comprises only Indian domiciles instead of Nepalese troops as in other Gorkha units of Army

Writes Vijay Mohan

Chandigarh, April 2 The Army has turned over a new leaf by raising a new Gorkha battalion comprising entirely of Gorkha troops of Indian domicile. Traditionally, the majority of troops in Gorkha regiments belong to Nepal.

This is the first Gorkha battalion to have come up in 50 years. The new battalion, the Sixth Battalion of the First Gorkha Rifles (6/1GR), christened “Kanchi Paltan”, has been raised at Sabathu in the Shivalik foothills near Shimla, that houses the 14 Gorkha Training Centre.

In 1815, the British had raised the first Gorkha battalion, 1/1 GR, from the remnants of General Amar Singh Thapa’s forces following the Gurkha War fought between the Gorkha kings of Nepal and British East India Company.

Col Avaneesh Chambial is the battalion’s first Commanding Officer. The recruits for the battalion had been undergoing training at the centre for the past nine months and the battalion’s regimental flag was unfurled by the Colonel of the First Gorkha Rifles, Lt Gen Ravi Thogde, at a ceremonial parade on Friday.
Troops of the newly raised 6th Battalion of the First Gorkha Rifles along with senior officers at
the 14 Gorkha Training Centre in Sabathu. A Tribune photograph
The Army has several Gorkha regiments — 1GR, 3GR, 4GR, 5GR, 8GR, 9GR and 11 GR. The stipulated ratio of composition of these regiments between Nepalese and Indian domicile Gorkhas is about 70:30. In some units it is 60:40.

The Army’s plans are that each Gorkha regiment will raise an additional battalion in due course as part of the approved force accretions and the ongoing organisational restructuring.

A senior officer said more Gorkhas of Indian domicile i.e. those settled in the hilly regions of northern India and the North-East and even other parts of the country would be recruited and Gorkha regiments were envisioned to have a pan-India footprint. The minimum educational qualification for Gorkha troops was also being raised from matriculation to Class XII.

Three years ago, the Army had raised the Sikkim Scouts comprising locally recruited youth from the state for deployment in the border regions. The unit has been affiliated with 11 GR.



Tribune News Service

Historical First Gorkha Regiment gets new Battalion 6/1GR

9:32 PM
CANDIGARH April 1st: The historical First Gorkha regiment of the Indian army has raised a new battalion on Friday at Subathu Cantonment, which is the birth place of the First Gorkha Rifles in Himachal Pradesh. The move is historical as the Gorkha regiment has raised a new battalion after a gap of almost five decades. As of now First Gorkha Regiment has five battalions and the new battalion would be known as 6/1GR (6/1 Gorkha Rifles).

The announcement about the raising of this battalion was made by Lt Gen Ravi Thodge, Master General of Ordinance and Colonel of the Regiment in October 2015 during the grand celebrations of Reunion-cum-Bicentenary of the Regiment.

First Gorkha regiment was raised on April 24, 1815 at Subathu Cantonment. The raising celebrations included wreath laying, special sainik sammelan and prayers at the regimental mandir to invoke the benign blessings of Goddess Durga. Lt Gen Ravi Thodge conveyed his best wishes to all ranks of newly raised battalion and exhorted them to perform at their best and to serve the nation in a manner befitting the magnificent Indian Army.
Historical First Gorkha Regiment gets new Battalion 6/1GR
Historical First Gorkha Regiment gets new Battalion 6/1GR
He also brought out that a modern and professional Indian army has to always be ready for any challenges that come its way. Colonel Avaneesh Chambial, has been appointed as the first commanding officer of the new battalion.

Via TOI

Gorkha Jawan From Darjeeling killed in avalanche in Siachen, Another Missing

8:14 AM
Lance Havildar Bhawan Tamang of Lopchu in Darjeeling has become Martyr, after a massive avalanche  hit a 2/11 Gorkha Rifles patrol party in Siachen glacier in Ladakh on Friday.

"Lance Havildar Bhawan Tamang, who was earlier rescued from an avalanche in Turtuk Sector succumbed to his injuries. The soldier, who was immediately retrieved and evacuated to the nearest medical facility, could not be revived by the medical team," said Colonel NN Joshi, defence spokesman at Srinagar.

The avalanche hit the partol party around 8 am at Turtuk area of Siachen — the highest battleground in the world — following which two jawans got buried under the snow, a defence spokesperson said.

Immediately, rescue drills were launched and one of the soldiers, Lance Havildar Bhawan Tamang, was rescued in a “critical” condition and shifted to a nearest medical facility.

Hailing from Kothey Dhura, Lopshu in Darjeeling of West Bengal, Lance Havildar Bhawan Tamang was part of the army patrol when it came under the massive avalanche in the Turtuk sector.

Lance Havildar Bhawan Tamang
Lance Havildar Bhawan Tamang 
Meanwhile, massive efforts are on to search and rescue the missing jawan, whose name the Army hasn't released is reportedly from Kalimpong, despite an inclement weather in the area.

Northern Command Army Commander Lt Gen D. S. Hooda has expressed his deep condolences to the family of Tamang.

On March 17, an avalanche had hit an army post situated at an altitude of 17,500 feet in the Kargil sector.

While one soldier was rescued immediately, the body of another jawan was retrieved from under the snow three days later.

Today's incident occurred one-and-half months after 10 soldiers were killed when a massive avalanche buried their post at 19,600 feet in the world's highest battlefield of Siachen.






Gorkha Regiment India's Most Badass Regiment, Nightmare For the Enemies

2:00 PM
Gorkha Regiment Is India's Most Badass Regiment And A Nightmare For Our Enemies

Writes Anshul Gandhi

“If a man says he‘s not afraid of dying, he’s either lying or he’s a Gorkha.”

This quote by Sam Manekshaw, Indian Army’s first Field Marshal, aptly describes what it means to be a Gorkha. Indian Army Gorkhas are meant to be fearless and as any military personnel worth his salt would know, they are also the most worthy warriors of the Indian Army.

Courage on war front and innumerable gallantry awards notwithstanding, the aura of Gorkhas on the field demands immense respect and makes the enemy tremble with fear. Their personal weapon is a ‘Kukri’, which is a 12-inch long curved knife and can be found with every Gorkha rifle personnel. The Kukri or Khukri is also embedded in their badges attested on the uniform.
Gorkha Regiment India's Most Badass Regiment, Nightmare For the Enemies
Gorkha Regiment India
The Gorkhas became an integral part of pre-independence British army after British General Sir David Ochterlony saw the Gorkha men fight against the British East Indian Company. From then on, Gorkhas have been a part of Afghan Wars, Indian Rebellion of 1857, and other United Nations peace keeping missions in Lebanon and Sierra Leone too.

After independence, out of the 10 Gorkha regiments at the time, six joined the Indian army. An 11th regiment was re-raised post-independence after many men from 7th and 10th regiment which had defected to the British army, joined the Indian army.

Currently, the Indian army is indebted to the service of 40,000 brave Gorkha soldiers in 42 different battalions of 7 regiments. One of the most famous platoon of Gorkhas, 1/11 Gorkha Rifles is one of the most decorated with 11 vir Chakras, 2 Maha Vir Chakras, 3 Ashok Chakras and 1 Param Vir Chakra. The stories of its Param Vir Chakra winner Lt. Manoj Kumar Pandey are a case study in their glorious history of courageous war footings.

Another famous battalion of Gorkhas is the third battalion of the 4 Gorkha Rifles which was instrumental in Operation Meghdoot in Siachen. The 8 Gorkha Rifles are also have a glorious past as they produced one of the only two Field Marshals for India – Sam Manekshaw. India’s current chief of army staff, General Dalbir Singh Suhag, is also from the Gorkha Regiment which is a testament of the most incredible services of Gorkhas.

On this Republic Day, we salute these brave men of the Gorkhas for their courage and sacrifice, may they bring more glory to our nation!

Source mensxp

Remembering Gorkhas on VIJAY‬ DIWAS

8:41 AM

On ‪‎VIJAY‬ DIWAS: We Remember and Salute Our Legends

To those who don't know about it, Vijay Diwas‬ is when 93000 Pakistani terrorists surrendered to 5000 Indian soldiers on ‪‎Dec16‬ 1971.

Amongst the various paltans that participated in the war for Bangladesh liberation, the ‪Gorkhas‬ have stood out  through their unparalleled bravery, sheer grit and determination, and won the platitude of laurels in not just India, but across the world.

Highlighting three major battles that the Gorkhas fought and won….

5/11 GR – BOGRA : THE BATTLE OF HILLI OR THE BATTLE OF BOGRA

Amongst the Gorkhas, the Fighting Fifth 5/11 GR won for themselves the Battle honour “BOGRA” for itself. In fact the battle honour Bogra and theater honour East Pakistan was bestowed to the 5th only.

In the Indo - Pakistani war of 1971 the 5th battalion was instrumental in liberating Bangladesh, In the operations of East Pakistan, the 5th had secured the Bogra town for 20 mountain division, in one of the most daring operations Lt Teja Bedi and his Gorkha troops had single-handedly captured the headquarters along with the Commanding Officer and RMO of the prestigious Baluch Regiment of East Pakistan.

The regimental flag of 52 Baluch Regiment is still HUNG UPSIDE DOWN in the officer’s mess of the 5th and is one of their prized possession.

4/5 GORKHAS: THE BATTLE FOUGHT WITH ONLY KHUKURIS

One great initial battle of the war fought at Atgram to break the outer crust of Pakistani defences in the East opposite Sylhet sector needs revisiting. The battalion tasked was 4/5 Gorkha Rifles (Frontier Force) which went on to capture Gazipur and eventually single-handedly took the surrender of the Sylhet garrison.

Not before and not since has any battalion launched a full scale assault employing just the Khukuri and guile alone. After getting their orders, by 5am the fierce Khukuri assault had silenced Pakistani Maj Alvi’s Bravo Company. In the mopping up, nearly 45 bodies were found scattered around the main position.

The heroes of this silent battle were Rifleman Dil Bahadur Chhetri, whose Khukuri accounted for eight Pakistan soldiers, and was awarded the Maha Vir Chakra; Rifleman Phas Bahadur Pun and 2nd Lieutenant Hawa Singh received posthumously, the Vir Chakra; and Captain Pravin Johry (posthumously) and Subedar Teerth Bahadur Gurung won the Sena Medal

[More details: http://bit.ly/1Rn8BJa]

4/5 GORKHA RIFLES (FRONTIER FORCE) - OPERATION OF SYLHET GORKHAS

The 4/5 Gorkhas were not to be left behind and were the 1st Indian troops to mount a Heliborne operations.

On a conservative estimate, the Heliborne Operation of Sylhet Gurkhas (4/5 Gorkha Rifles (Frontier Force)) made it possible for Indian Army and Mukhti Bahini to reach Dacca much earlier than planned; at least by 8 days.

On the 16th, when the surrender ceremony was going on at Dacca, Sylhet Gurkhas were celebrating with a toast, in honour of three fold success of the Battalion:

1. First Ever Successful Heliborne Operation of Indian Army, which tied the two brigades from the 7th to the 15th of December. 
2. Surrender of two Pakistani Brigades (202 and 313) on 15th December 1971. 
3. First major surrender to own forces in the Eastern Theatre. 
But the fourth larger toast, unknown to them at that time, was reserved for surrender at Dacca, which was thought unattainable.

For 'Early Dacca Surrender' was made possible by Sylhet Gurkhas tying down the Pakistani Meghna River Brigade (313), in addition to 202 Pak Infantry Brigade at Sylhet from the 7th to the 15th.

However, the degree of valour and contribution to the early creation of free Bangladesh, credit also goes to the men of the Sylhet Gurkhas, but not without a price. The cost of glory over the 27 days (20th November to 16th December) was not meagre.

Thirty one (4 Officers, 3 Junior Commissioned Officers, 7 Non-Commissioned Officers and 17 Riflemen) sacrificed their lives. Ironically one officer (Major Puri) and one Rifleman (Rifleman Kanta Bir Thapa) were injured during the 1965 War also, but this time they sacrificed their lives.

Another 122 (7 Officers, 2 Junior Commissioned Officers, 32 Non- Commissioned Officers and 81 Riflemen) were injured. A total of 153 casualties, including 11 Officers, constituted nearly 25 percent of the Battalion strength, out of which 55 were leaders at different levels (Officers, Junior Commissioned Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers); nearly 8 percent of the Battalion strength. This was the leadership and lead provided by Company, Platoon and Section Commanders.

Sylhet is the Battle Honour of The Sylhet Gorkhas and East Pakistan as Theatre Honour and nobody can deny that Heliborne Operations by Sylhet Gurkhas lead to early surrender at Dacca in December 1971.

[More details: http://bit.ly/1O7v4K2]

We SALUTE the bravery of our troops, and celebrate their great legacy.

While others may forget…. WE REMEMBER!!

Source : TheDC

Indian Army will raise a new Gorkha Battalion 6/1GR by April 2016

9:37 AM

SUBATHU: The historic First Gorkha Regiment (GR) of the Indian Army would raise a new battalion in April next year. It's after a gap of almost five decades that the Gorkha Regiment would be raising new battalion. As of now First Gorkha Regiment has five battalions and the new battalion would be known as 6/1GR.

Confirming the development, Lieutenant General Ravi Thodge, Quarter Master General of Indian Army and Colonel of the First Gorkha regiment, said the new battalion would be raised by April 2016, at historic Subathu Cantonment of Himachal Pradesh.

Gen Thodge, who was at Subathu on Thursday to celebrate the bicentenary celebrations and reunion of the of First Gorkha regiments, said the new battalion would not only include the gritty Gorkhas from Nepal but also Gorkha boys from Dehradun, West Bengal, Kangra and Dharmashala areas of Himachal Pradesh.

The First Gorkha regiment was raised 200 years back in April 1815 at Subathu cantonment. Around 1,500 soldiers including retired generals, pensioners from Nepal and various part of country along with their families had gathered at the Subathu cantonment to celebrate much awaited bicentenary celebrations and reunion of regiment, which comes once in four years. The celebrations would continue till Saturday. Till then they would stay there to enjoy the gala of customary celebrations that are part of the legacy of the historic regiment.

Celebrations started with a wreath-laying ceremony on Thursday morning at the Regimental War Memorial, where floral tributes were paid to those killed in the line of duty. A ceremonial guard reversed arms while buglers sounded the last post followed by the rouse.

Thereafter, Colonel of the regiment Lt Gen Ravi Thodge addressed the gathering and praised cordiality of Gorkha soldier and their courage and eagerness to lay down life in the line of duty.

Lt Gen H J S Sachdeva, director general, Assam Rifles and one of the senior officers of the regiment was also present on the occasion.

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