Showing posts with label Gorkhas in India. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gorkhas in India. Show all posts

GORKHA PRIDE: Former Indian Hockey Captain Bharat Chettri Wins Dhyanchand Award

9:56 PM

Every sports person worth his/her salt dreams of representing the National Team, very few get to become a part of that privileged group of select individuals who are called on to do the national duty. Rarer still are the chances even amongst those very few individuals who have been called on national duty to be asked to Lead the National Team .
Bharat Chettri Wins Dhyanchand Award

But the rarest of those honours, that every sporting individual dreams of all life long, is to lead the team in the Olympics.

Bharat Chettri - local Kalimpong lad has lived all the dreams any sports person can dream of.

He has the distinction of being the first goalie ever in the history of Indian hockey to lead Team India at the Olympics. He has participated in and won many international tournaments for India.

Yesterday, President of India Ram Nath Kovind presented Dhyan Chand Award 2018 to one of our National Icons Shri Bharat Kumar Chettri in recognition of his outstanding achievements and contribution for the promotion of Hockey.

The Dhyan Chand Award, officially known as Dhyan Chand Award for Lifetime Achievement in Sports and Games, is the lifetime achievement sporting honour of the Republic of India. The award is named after Dhyan Chand (1905–79), an Indian field hockey player who scored more than 1000 goals during a career which spanned over 20 years from 1926 to 1948.

It is awarded annually by the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports. Recipients are selected by a committee constituted by the Ministry and are honoured for their contributions to sport both during their active sporting career and after retirement.

We Congratulate Bharat sir for his wonderful achievement, and for being so phenomenally inspirational.

Via The DC

The First Indian Gorkha Ambassador - Nina Tshering La

2:05 PM
ACHIEVEMENT - PROUD GORKHA

Nina Tshering La – 1st Indian Ambassador From Darjeeling Gorkha Community
Smt Nina Tshering La was appointed as the Ambassador of India to the Democratic Republic of Congo, Africa, on 10th of July 2018. She is the first Indian Ambassador to be appointed from the Darjeeling Gorkha community.
Nina Tshering La
Nina Tshering La – 1st Indian Ambassador From Darjeeling Gorkha Community

Being the proud daughter of “Fire Brigade ko Saila Baba and Saili Aama”., Smt Nina is the second of six siblings. Her father worked in the Darjeeling Fire Brigade. He passed away in 2000. Her mother, who lives in Delhi is a proud mother today.

Smt Nina schooled in Loreto Convent Darjeeling and completed her Master’s degree in the French language from the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. She is married to Shri Rinzeen La, who is also from Darjeeling, studied in Goethals Kurseong and holds a Master’s degree in International Relations from the Jawaharlal Nehru University. Mr La gave up his promising career in Air India to support and accompany his wife. They have a 25-year-old son who after completing his MBA is working in Hyderabad.

Nina grew up in a little hamlet called Haridass Hatta below Loreto Convent School, in the love and care of her maternal family comprising St. Teresa School’s Dhansari Gurama who passed away recently and Shri Sisir Dewan Sir of Takdah Cantonment and Kamal Kumar Gurung of Himalayan travels, who today is more than a brother to her.

Smt Nina Tshering La presented her credential letters to the President of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) on 11th August and formally took up charge as Ambassador of India to the DRC.

We are proud of Smt. Nina beyond measures and share the happiness in Congratulating her with all of you. Our daughters have always sprinted ahead in the front line of our community and broken many barriers, while creating many moments of great pride and honour for us. Smt. Nina has brought us one such moment which shall remain with us and inspire more of our daughters and also sons to achieve greater things in life.

Via TheDC

Whom Shall We Remember Today?

3:01 PM
Writes - Jyoti Thapa Mani

“A nation’s culture resides in the heart and soul of its people” -Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi 1869-1948

For the last two years, I have been penning Independence Day articles for TheDC, hailing heroes and heroines from the Indian Gorkha community who fought for India’s freedom.  This year I feel a vacuum. Because I feel we are still struggling more than ever before.


Recently, I attended a panel discussion on ‘In today’s globalised world, what role does nationalism play in India’s context?’ A mouthful of words, but essentially I think, it was about how nationalistic we are in this global age. One panellist said that nationalism is about the national bird, animal, dress, anthem and khichri. Another said it was about remembering our freedom struggle against the ‘other’, meaning the British rule. And what a costly affair it was, as freedom came with a big rider—the division of India and Pakistan based on religion.  A criterion, which after seventy-two years, appears as so very wrong. Millions were rendered homeless as they staggered across the borders by foot, on bullock carts, in trains and buses under the onslaught of massive violence and suffering. Lives, families and belongings were lost in the mayhem to reach a new homeland as per their religious identity. The governments in their hurry failed at maintaining a peaceful exchange.

After the British ‘other’, new ‘others’ took its place. Many Indians are still struggling for their identity. Some inside before 1947 are still crying for recognition. On the other hand, millions of refugees continue to pour into India. Some intellectuals say India is a huge tent where everyone can be accommodated. Others say sorry there is no more space in the tent.  Some expostulate that India stands for compassion. Clearly, idealism and reality knock heads in many ways and no one sees the middle path. Power and money appear to be the new nationalism. Nobody talks about the need to strengthen nationalism in terms of the Indian citizens feeling at home.

Millions of Indians born and raised in India go abroad and take oaths such as “I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America”. Where does the Indian nationalism go then?

Either, there are those living in the world of ‘global opportunity-nationalism’ or clinging to archaic forms of racial insularity by dominating the minority. Dirty words like fascism are still surviving under new names. Leaders try hard to convince that we are a multinational and multicultural state because it sounds so good and upwardly mobile.  But murky waters lie deep beneath. Nationalism has different connotations for everyone and ironically the government has to force Indians to stand for the anthem in movie halls. Terms like the nation, nation-state, state, global citizen are weighing down or buoying up mindsets.

How nationalistic do we Indian Gorkhas feel? We are the country’s sterling defence force, but socially we are still perceived as immigrants from Nepal, foreigners on Indian soil. Despite the fact, that we have been citizens of this land for more than two hundred years. Our Indian identity on the face of it is as vague as a peel-off beauty mask. Funny thing is that while millions of Indians are migrating to the west, we are still here struggling to be accepted as Indians.  Its been a year now since the last agitation for Gorkhaland in the Darjeeling Hills witnessed yet another saga of dead bodies, persecution, humiliation and forceful crackdown. The Gorkhas of Darjeeling Hills are still fighting for independence from the ‘other’ being West Bengal government. Ironical, because the same government allows foreign nationals from Bangladesh to pour in millions and work without even a work permit. Bangladesh and India have no such treaty facilitating this.

So whom shall we remember today?

Shall we remember the 1947 era Gorkha freedom fighters for India’s Independence? They include patriots such as Amar Singh Thapa, Agam Singh Giri, Bhagat Bir Lama, Bhim Singh Rana, Balbhadra Chhetri, Bairagi Baba, Bhairav Singh Lama, Buddhiman, Bir Bahadur Gurung, Bishan Singh Khatri, Bishan Singh Rana, Bishnu Lal Upadhayay, Bhakta Bahadur Pradhan, Bhagwan Singh Thapa, Bhim Bahadur Khadka, Bhim Lal Sharma, Chandra Kumar Sharma, Chabilal Upadhyay, Dal Bahadur Giri, Dig Bir Singh Ramudamu, Dalbir Singh Lohar, Dhruba Singh Thapa, Devi Prasad Sharma, Dharmananda Upadhyay Mishra, Damber Singh Hingman, Gorey Khan, Gaga Tshering Dukpa, Gopal Singh Rana, Gopal Singh Shahi, Hari Prashad Upadhayay, Harish Chhetri, Hoshiyar Singh Karki, Hari Prashad, Hira Singh Khatri, Ishwarananda Gorkha, Indrani Thapa, Jung Bir Sapkota, Jai Narayan Upadhayay, Kumud Chandra Gorkha, Krishna Bahadur Sunwar, Khadga Bahadur Singh Bista, Laxman Limbu, Lal Bahadur Basnet, Man Bahadur Thapa , Mohan Singh Thapa , Mahabir Giri, Man Bahadur Rai, Maya Devi Chhetri, Niranjan Singh Chettri, Norbu Lama, Neetanand Tim Sinha, Pratiman Singh Lama, Parash Ram Thapa, Putlimaya Devi, Pushpa Kumar Ghisingh, Punna Singh Thakur, Padam Prasad Dhungel, Prem Singh Bista, Ratan Singh Lama, Ram Lal Upadhyay, Ram Singh Gurung, Shyam Bahadur Thapa, Samsher Singh Bhandari, Shyam Singh Shahi, Shiv Singh Thapa, Sher Bahadur Thapa, Sher Bahadur Allay, Shanker Dev Sharma, Savitri Devi, Thakur Prasad Kumai, Tej Bahadur Thapa (1), Tej Bahadur Thapa (2) and Tej Bahadur Subba.

Or shall we remember the INA freedom fighters from the 2/1 Gorkha Rifles? Including, the zealous INA Major Durga Malla, INA Captain Dal Bahadur Thapa, INA Captain Ram Singh Thakur, Bhim Singh Rana, Man Bahadur Thapa, Mohan Singh Thapa, Gopal Singh Shahi, Shaheed Shiam Bahadur Thapa and about forty-six more names.

Post 1947, do we remember the one thousand two hundred and one (1201) martyrs of the Gorkhaland agitation?  They include the thirteen unfortunate people killed by police firing in 1986 in Kalimpong and so many more with bullets shot straight to the head by WB police forces.

Or do we remember in recent times those killed in the 2017 Strike for Gorkhaland?  They include amongst many, the names of Bimal Sashankar of Goke, Mahesh Gurung of Relling, Sunil Rai of Kaijaley, Tashi Bhutia of Sonada, Suraj Bhushal of Tung Sung, Samir Gurung of Singamari, Ashok Tamang of Lewis Jubilee, Asish Tamang of Sukhiapokhri and Dawa Tshering Bhutia of Pedong.

Via TheDC

Bimal Gurung's message on Independence Day

12:21 PM
Bimal Gurung have released a press statement on the occasion on 72nd Independence Day. 

Following is the press release :-

On behalf of all the Gorkhas spread across our nation, I (Bimal Gurung) wish you all a very Happy Independence Day.

The commemoration of Independence Day is a very personal experience for all the Indian Gorkha families, as every family has sacrificed a member to uphold the freedom and independence of our nation.
Bimal Gurung's message on Independence Day
Bimal Gurung 

From the very first Gorkha Freedom Martyr Subedar Niranjan Chhetri of Manipur to INA Major Durga Malla of Dehradun. From organizing labourers in the coal mines of Bihar as Helen Lepcha to blowing up British Tanks in Burma as INA Janbaz Dal Martyrs Sabitri Thapa and Indreni Thapa. From giving music to Indian National Anthem as INA Capt Ram Singh Thakuri of Himachal to helping draft the constitution of our great nation as Adv. Ari Bahadur Gurung of Darjeeling and thousands others like them, the glorious Gorkha contributions to the Freedom Movement of India is what inspires the present day Gorkhas to carry on, with the same sense of patriotism and sense of duty towards our nation.

Each day thousands of Gorkha men and women put their life at risk to protect our nation from inimical forces, and they do so with the same pride and joy, with which our ancestors had fought to secure the freedom of our nation from the colonialists.

Today as we celebrate the Independence Day, I request you to take a moment to thank all those brave men and women who are serving as soldiers in the army, navy, airforce, paramilitary forces and police, and their families whose sacrifices make it possible for us to remain independent.

While we are today celebrating the 72nd Independence Day, I want to draw the attention of our nation towards the plight of minority Gorkhas, Adivasis, and Rajbanshis in North Bengal. Today, all our fundamental rights have been curtailed and all the provisions of our constitution that guarantees us to have a say in our nation has been snatched away by the West Bengal government. While the nation is celebrating our Independence Day thousands of Gorkhaland supporters are being hounded, arrested, and threatened for demanding what is guaranteed under Article 3 of our constitution - a new state.

Freedom is an essence for which our ancestors sacrificed their everything, and today that very freedom is being denied to our people. I therefore appeal to every citizen of our nation, to pledge to stand with us in our struggle for justice, equality, and freedom from tyrany, oppression and discrimination that we are facing in West Bengal.

On behalf of the Gorkhas, I once again wish you all a very Happy Independence Day.

Jai Hind, Jai Gorkhaland

Bimal Gurung
President, Central Committe
Gorkha Janmukti Morcha

Gorkhas May Suffer if NRC implemented in West Bengal

11:15 AM
If the NRC Is Extended to West Bengal, Indian Gorkhas May End Up Suffering
Swaraj Thapa

Questions over identity and citizenship of Indian Gorkhas have long persisted, which is one of the reasons behind the community's consistent demand for a Gorkhaland state.

As the debate continues over what will happen to those who will eventually be excluded from the final NRC list, Gorkhas or Nepalis in India would be well advised against rushing in to draw conclusions with regard to the exercise and instead analyse and assess possible implications that it could have on them, their status and identity.

On the face of it, the move to update the National Register of Citizens (NRC) initiated at the behest of the Supreme Court to identify undocumented immigrants in Assam is welcome. For Gorkhas of India, who have been beset with an identity crisis and sometimes perceived as foreigners, it would naturally follow that an NRC would be another step in certifying them as Indians. Enlistment in the NRC will after all, affirm citizenship.

However, there are a few reasons why Gorkhas must tread with caution.

Gorkhas are well represented in the army and have given their lives in every battle fought for the country. However, recent news reports state that over one lakh Gorkhas or Nepalis have been excluded from the draft final NRC list. These Gorkhas or Nepalis, of course, will be given an opportunity to submit documents in support of their claim of being Indian citizens. They may be included in the final list or be excluded, if they are identified as immigrants from Nepal.

But this development points to the larger malaise afflicting Gorkhas or Nepalis in India: that of identity and the perception that all Gorkhas are immigrants from Nepal. How does one ensure that Indian Gorkhas do not get excluded from such a list?

In fact, it is this flogging stick that is invariably sought to be flashed whenever Indian Gorkhas or Nepalis have attempted to re-assert their identity and stake their rightful claim in nation-building. The most recent example was witnessed in Darjeeling last year. What began as a protest to oppose attempts to impose Bengali language in all schools in the state, including Darjeeling, soon turned into an agitation for identity and a demand for a separate state.

As the state began to crackdown on the protesters, it wasn’t long before the narrative took a different turn. The top leadership was charged with having links to Nepal’s Maoists. Some of the leaders involved – elected members of the Darjeeling municipality, a former elected councillor – were singled out to be alleged Nepalese citizens and hence foreigners. Systematically, their membership from respective elected bodies were sought to be cancelled and their names struck off the voters list. Reports also began circulating that authorities were considering looking at documentation of the local population dating back to 1950: a message that migrant Nepalese will be weeded out.

Hardly new tactics

Such tactics are hardly new for Gorkhas in India and those in public life have had to face it at every corner. Sikkim chief minister Pawan Kumar Chamling has been accused of being a Nepali citizen, notwithstanding that he recently became the longest serving chief minister in the country. M.K. Subba, a three-term former MP from Assam, faced allegations that he was a Nepali citizen. He was expelled from the Congress party in 2014 and suffered a sudden illness soon after. Balkrishna Acharya, the low profile MD of Patanjali Ayurved and arguably among the richest Indians with a reported networth of US$6.5 billion, faced investigation under the UPA government on charges that he was a Nepali citizen and had forged documents to obtain an Indian passport. In Darjeeling itself, Gorkha candidates contesting local polls in Terai regions like Naxalbari and Phansidewa are faced with slogans that they should go back to Nepal. Questioning the identity of Gorkhas of India, make no mistake, has been around for a long time.

Admittedly, one of the key reasons for Indian Gorkhas or Nepalis facing this crisis is the 1950 Treaty of Peace and Friendship signed by India and Nepal. The open border between the two countries as a consequence of the treaty, allowing citizens of both countries a free passage. Indeed, barring electoral privileges, any Nepali citizen can purchase property in India, do business and even join government jobs at certain levels officially while continuing to remain citizens of Nepal.

Article 7 of the friendship treaty states:

“The governments of India and Nepal agree to grant, on reciprocal basis, to the nationals of one country in the territories of the other the same privileges in the matter of residence, ownership of property, participation in trade and commerce, movement and other privileges of a similar nature.”



There is also a history of Nepali citizens joining the Indian Army, many of whom are now in senior positions. I have met officers in the rank of Colonel, who are Nepali citizens. There is a sizeable migrant population.

An identity crisis

The confusion created by the arrangement in the mind of an average Indian also poses an identity crisis for Indian Gorkhas. While the borders are open, there exists no mechanism for a head count of the people entering or exiting. This makes it difficult to estimate the actual number of immigrant Nepalis in India.

While the 1950 treaty entitles Nepali citizens to live in India, I am apprehensive that should the NRC exercise ever be extended to West Bengal, it could pose problems for Gorkhas or Nepalis because a majority of the population in Darjeeling and surrounding Terai region have rarely maintained adequate documentation with regard to their residential claims. BJP leaders in West Bengal have already saidthey will implement NRC in the state if the party comes to power. Assam and West Bengal, incidentally, have the highest number of Gorkhas in the country.

An attempt to amend the 1950 treaty has been underway for some time now with a joint Eminent Persons Group (EPG) set up by both governments. It has finalised its recommendations. If the EPG is able to recommend a mechanism that will make a clear distinction between Indian Gorkhas and Nepali nationals living and working in India, the former would not face questions over their identity.

A public Indian identity

Historically, Darjeeling and Sikkim, because of the concentration of Gorkhas living there, have led the campaign for a public Indian identity. Leaders from the two places were at the forefront of the Nepali language movement. But naturally, language was also the rallying point for a wider political demand, as witnessed anywhere else. Whether it was the anti-Hindi imposition agitation in the South or the Bengali language movement in Assam, the result was a political consolidation of the forces opposing such moves.

Similarly, Gorkhas or Nepalis of India got together after former Prime Minister Morarji Desai erroneously said in 1977 that Nepali is a foreign langauge and all Nepalis in India are foreigners. It triggered a nationwide Bhasha Andolan, which became a unifying factor in the bid to fashion a distinct Indian identity.

The formulation of Indian Gorkha identity received wider support during the Subhash Ghisingh led Gorkhaland movement of the mid-1980s, not just in the Darjeeling region, but even elsewhere in the country. Although self-rule and identity were the primary objectives, language also played a key role. Ultimately, the Centre conceded and Nepali was included as one of the official languages in the eighth schedule of the Constitution in 1992. Additionally, the Centre also issued a gazette notification in 1988 clarifying that Gorkhas residing in India were Indian citizens.

Mamata Banerjee’s Bengal and Assam contrast

Today, when West Bengal chief minister Mamata Banerjee vociferously takes up the cause of the 40 lakh people excluded from the NRC final draft list – most of them speakers of the Bengali language – one cannot but compare the contrast in her actions with respect to Gorkhas. A poem titled “Identity” that she penned for the 40 lakh excluded from the NRC could well have echoed the pain and anguish suffered by Indian Gorkhas for several decades now.

Yet, it is ironical how Banerjee failed to appreciate the similarities between Bengali speaking population of Assam and Nepali speaking population in West Bengal. Both are multilingual states where minority groups are under pressure from the majority, resulting in identity assertion of the minorities. That was the logical explanation for the flareup over language issue in Darjeeling last year.

There are lessons to be learnt in every movement. While every state is multilingual and mandated to respect the rights of linguistic minorities, political practice has demonstrated that the official language symbolises the state. Speakers of minority languages find that discrimination against them by the majority community is based not on language competence or achievement, but on language identification. The Rajbanshis and Kochs of Cooch Behar have assimilated themselves, adopting Bengali as their language. But Gorkhas have resisted this and have paid the price. As a consequence, Gorkhas of Darjeeling feel that a separate state is the only answer to the problems of identity and discrimination.

An NRC in West Bengal may not be unwelcome, but a clear distinction has to be made between Indian Gorkhas and immigrant Nepalese living in India first.

Swaraj Thapa is a political commentator and activist.

Via The Wire

विमल गुरुङले दिए स्वतन्त्रता दिवसको शुभकामना अनि भने –‘हामी स्वतन्त्रतादेखि बञ्चित छौँ’

4:33 PM
दार्जीलिङ 14 अगस्त।
‘स्वतन्त्रता एउटा यस्तो मर्म हो जसको निम्ति हाम्रो पुर्खाहरूले सबै गुमाए, तथापी आज हामी स्वतन्त्रतादेखि बञ्चित छौँ’ उक्त कुरा गोजमुमो पार्टीका भूमिगत नेता विमल गुरुङले एक प्रेस विज्ञप्ति जारी गरेर भनेका छन्। उनले 72 औँ स्वतन्त्रता दिवसको सबैलाई शुभकामना व्यक्त गर्दै देशले स्वतन्त्रता दिवस मनाइरहेको अवस्थामा यता संविधान अनुसार छुट्टै राज्य गोर्खाल्याण्ड माग्नेहरूलाई पक्राउ र धम्काउने कार्य गरेको आरोप लगाएका छन्।
Bimal Gurung independence day message

‘म सबै राष्ट्रवासीलाई अनुरोध गर्न चाहन्छु, पश्चिम बङ्गालमा हामीले भोग्दै आइरहेको तानाशाही व्यवहार, उत्पीडन अनि भेदभावपूर्ण व्यवहारको विरुद्ध तपाईँहरू हाम्रो न्याय, समानता अनि स्वतन्त्रताको निम्ति लडिरहेको संघर्षमा उभिइदिनुहोस्’ विमल गुरुङले विज्ञप्तिमा अझ भनेका छन् –‘आज हामी 72 औँ स्वतन्त्रता दिवस मनाउन  गइरहेको बेला म, उत्तर बङ्गालको अल्पसङ्ख्यक गोर्खा, राजवंशी अनि आदिवासीहरूको दुर्दशाबारे राष्ट्रको ध्यानाकर्षण गराउन चाहन्चु। आज हाम्रो सबै मौलिक अधिकारहरू लगायत भारतीय संविधानको दिएको संवैधानिक सुरक्षाका प्रत्याभूइथरू पश्चिम बङ्गाल सरकारद्वारा खोसिएको छ।’

उनले देश स्वतन्त्रताको निम्ति भारतीय गोर्खाहरूले आफ्ना परिवारका सदस्यहरू गुमाएको भन्दै भारतीय स्वतन्त्रताको निम्ति सहिद बन्नेहरूको नाउँ समेत उल्लेख गरेका छन्। यद्यपी त्यहीँ देश स्वतन्त्रताको निम्ति लड्ने गोर्खाहरूले भने आजसम्म न्याय पाउन नसकेको पनि गुरुङले दुखेसो प्रकट गरेका छन्।

Gorkhas in India are Indian citizens or legal migrants, says Nepal

8:34 PM

Writes Geeta Mohan

One of the major fallout of the National Register for Citizens (NRC) list in Assam would be on Gorkhas in India. According to reports, an estimated one lakh Gorkhas have been kept out of the draft that was published on July 30 that could be a cause for major consternation between the government and the Gorkha community.
The question that arises out of this is what would the status of the Gorkhas in India be. Nepals Embassy in India believes that this is not a bilateral matter at all and that Gorkhas living in different parts of the country are all Indian citizens.
File Photo
Speaking to India Today, Hari Odari, spokesperson in the Nepalese Embassy in New Delhi said, As far as we are concerned, Gorkhas in Assam, West Bengal, Uttarakhand and other parts of India are Indian citizens or legal migrants. This issue has never been a part of our bilateral relations or conversations.
This list which according to Indian government officials is not the final list has raised concerns among the Gorkha community of Assam. Data collected from the districts imply about 1 lakh of our people are missing from the NRC, the highest being in Baksa district followed by Sonitpur and Golaghat. They should never have been excluded because the March 24, 1971 cut-off does not apply to the Gorkhas, Prem Tamang, president of the All Assam Gorkha Students Union, told India Today
Sources in the Nepalese government in Kathmandu told India Today, This is Indias internal matter, its domestic matter. We dont interfere in that. They will resolve it themselves.
The difference between illegal immigrants from Bangladesh and Nepalese coming into India is the Indo-Nepal Treaty of 1950.
Article 7 of the Treaty states, The Governments of India and Nepal agree to grant, on reciprocal basis, to the nationals of one country in the territories o the other the same privileges in the matter of residence, ownership of property, participation in trade and commerce, movement and other privileges of a similar nature.
Professor Mahendra P. Lama, from Jawaharlal Nehru University, says, For the Nepalese migrants under 1950 Treaty, they might not be citizens but they are legal migrants. No Nepalese migrant can be ousted or declared illegal anywhere in India under the Indo-Nepal treaty.
The problem with this clause is that if Nepalese people are allowed equal rights without being citizens then how does one differentiate them from those who acquired Indian citizenship by right of being descendants of soldiers recruited by the Indian Army.
It is a very clear case. Those who are Indian Gorkhas cant be deprived of Indian citizenship because of lack of documents because the processes in the past and municipality structures were not organised. The question of not giving them citizenship does not arise, says Professor Lama.
Interestingly, the Assam agitation of the 70s and 80s was a popular movement launched against outsiders included not only illegal immigrants from Bangladesh but also Gorkhas and other outsiders such as the Santhal tribe in India going in and settling in the state of Assam.
The agitation ended in August of 1985 following the Assam Accord which gave a cut-off date of March 24, 1971. People with documents establishing their stay in Assam up to the midnight of that date are eligible for inclusion in the NRC.
India Today

 
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