Showing posts with label music. Show all posts
Showing posts with label music. Show all posts

Legendary Singer Aruna Lama Conferred Nepal Ratna Award April 14, 2019: Legendary

4:48 PM
Nepali singer Smt. Aruna Lama (Pradhan), born in Darjeeling, was conferred the prestigious Nepal Ratna, Mahaujjwal Rashtradeep Award (Suprabal Janasewa Shree Tritiya) for her contribution to promoting Nepali music around the world. The President of Nepal, Bidya Devi Bhandari conferred the award at a special ceremony held at the Office of the President, Maharajgunj.

Legendary Singer Aruna Lama Conferred Nepal Ratna Award
Born on the 9th of September, 1945 at Ghoom Pahar, Darjeeling, Aruna Lama is popularly known as the “Nightingale of the Hills”. She has rendered hundreds of Nepali songs and left an indelible mark as one of the finest Nepali singers.

The illustrious title by the Nepal government is conferred on  Nepali citizens and foreigners who make outstanding contributions to the welfare of Nepal and Nepali language and art.

Via The DC

Aruna Lama "Nightingale of the Hills"

12:04 PM
Aruna Lama (Nepali: अरुणा लामा) 9 September 1945 – 4 February 1998) was one of the well-known singers of Nepali music. She is popularly known as "Nightingale of the Hills". She sang hundreds of Nepalisongs, including some for Nepali Film, and left an indelible mark as one of the best singers in Nepali music.

Aruna Lama


Biography

Aruna Lama was born on 9 September 1945 at Ghoom Pahar, Darjeeling, British India to Nepali parents Surya Bahadur Lama and Sanmaya Lama.[1] Her uncle C.B. Lama inspired her to sing from the age of 7. She won a music competition organized by the Gorkha Dukha Niwarak Sammelan (GDNS) in 1956 at the age of 11 and then she never looked back. Amber Gurung, one of the stalwarts of Nepali music, groomed her in singing from 1958. Aruna Lama did her schooling at Mungpoo Primary School, Jalpahar, and St. Teresa's School, Darjeeling. She completed her graduate degree in arts from Darjeeling Government College. In 1963, Aruna Lama married Saran Pradhan, another Nepali musician. In 1974, her husband died and she was left with her two children, Sapna (Pradhan) Thapa and Supreet Raj Pradhan. She worked hard to raise them, working as an assistant teacher in St. Alphonsus School (1965) and finally found work at the Scheduled Castes and Tribes Welfare Office in Darjeeling where she worked till 1998. She continued to sing even with all her struggles till the end of her life.

Music

Aruna Lama sang for numerous music composers, most notably Amber Gurung, Karma Yonzon, Gopal Yonzon, Shanti Thatal, Narayan Gopal, Mani Kamal Chettri and Dibya Khaling. Her first song was composed by Amber Gurung lyrics written by Bhupi Sherchan in 1961. Some of her classic hits are Eh Kancha Malai Sunko Tara, Phool Lai Sodhey, Pohor Saal Khusi Phatda, Hera Na Hera Kancha, Laharey Bara Ghumauney Chautari, Eklai Basda and Nepali Gaurav Garchau Afnaipanma. She also sang for a number of Nepali films, such as Maitighar, Paral Ko Aago and Kanchhi, these film songs are remembered even today. Some of her notable musical performances include Raag Rajat at Gorkha Rangamanch, Darjeeling 1981; Arunanjaliat Pragya Bhawan, Kathmandu; and Aruna Lama Swarnim Saanjh at Pragya Bhawan, Kathmandu.

Awards

Aruna Lama received numerous awards both in Nepal and India for her singing and contribution to Nepali music. Some of these awards include Sangit Puraskar (1966), Sur Sringar Sammelan Puraskar (1966), Mitrasen Puraskar (Assam Nepali Sahitya /Sanskritik Parishad 1975), Dishari Puraskar (Kolkata 1980), Bhanu Academy Puraskar (Darjeeling 1982), Nepali Chalchitra Puraskar (for Maitighar 1983), Chinnlata Geet Puraskar (Kathmandu 1992), Urvashi Rang Puraskar (Kathmandu 1992), Mitrasen Sangeet Puraskar (Gangtok 1995), Gorkha Dakshina Bahu 4th (Kathmandu 1996), Sadhna Puraskar (Kathmandu), Nightingale of the Hills (Hindustan Recording Sangsthan, Kolkata), Swar Kinnari (Sitaram Sahitya Pratisthan, Kathmandu) and Swar Samagri (Arunanjali Programme, Kathmandu).

Selected songs

Kancha Malai Sunko Tara
Phool Lai Sodhey
Pohor Saal Khusi Phatyo
Nepali Gaurav Garchau Afnaipanma
Manma Timro
Hanga Hanga
Aankhama Mero
Udas Mero
Chautarima Basera
Eklai Basda
Sabaile Bhanthe
Hera Na Hera Kancha
Aankhaharule
Laharey Bara Ghumauney Chautari
Udi Jaaun Bhane Panchi Hoina (Movie: Paral Ko Aago)
Himal Sari Ma (Movie: Kanchhi)
Yee Timra Muskan (Movie: Kanchhi)
Kala Kala Sala Sala (Movie: Kanchhi)

Apurva Tamang selected for Indian Idol 10

11:12 AM
Indian Gorkha Apurva Tamang the talented singer from Mirik Darjeeling District has been selected in National TV Show Indian Idol Season 10. He has been a strong contestant of Indian Idol Junior and Zee TV sa re ga ma pa Lil Champs in the past and is capable of winning the Indian Idol season 10.
 Apurva Tamang

Apurva Tamang born on 24th September 1999 from Mirik, Darjeeling burst into music and entertainment scene as a child sensation, gaining fame as a phenomenal singer on Zee TV's SA RE GA MA PA 2009 L'il Champs making it to the Wild Card entry.

 He started singing at a very tender age of 3 and continued to pursue his vocal training in Hindustani Classical style while at the same time keeping up with world wide trends HIP-POP and RNB. He has performed at many national and international  shows and was awarded numerous honors which include Gorkha Gaurav Samman, Nagarik Samman, Sarojini Gems Memorial etc. he has lent his voice to many regional music videos and movies including Nepali movie 'DHRUVA TARA" and continues to garner appreciation and admiration for his singing prowess wherever he perform.

He has learnt Visharad in Hindustani Classical vocal from the Institute of Prayag Sangeet Samiti AllhabadStart from 02/07/2010 to Date02/07/2017. His Genre are world music, thumri, sufi, ghazal, fusion, experimental, disco, indian classical, classic rock


SOME STRAY THOUGHTS ON – BIPUL'S SKETCHES OF DARJEELING

4:17 PM
Writes: Prabin Moktan

Back in 1998 I had accompanied a talented group of Higher Secondary boys from St. Augustine’s to Mount Hermon for the ISC Fest.

Representing SAS in the solo song category of the Western Music Competition was Bipul Chettri, then a slightly intense, almost brooding musician, respected immensely by his cohorts for his virtuosity with the guitar. Bipul’s eclectic listening tastes was reflected in his choice of the song that he was covering- Hook by Blues Traveller. Bipul belted out the song like a rock star. As a performance it was rough, patchily brilliant.

Later when the results were declared the breathless announcer got carried away and breaching MC norms went well beyond the third position to declare that Bipul Chettri of SAS had been declared… last. Perhaps the judges (names available upon request) were looking at something else - a hill diva belting out something from the Titanic or a hymn.
Bipul Chettri
Bipul Chettri
Whatever the case the disappointment amongst the SAS contingent was palpable but no one so much as raised a single decibel of protest at Bipul for marring what had been a perfect outing so far.
Then about a decade or more later I heard Dadhelo. The link to the song on soundcloud was posted by Evan Manandhar another Sasonian who had made a perceptive comment about the Nepali accent of the singer.

This song was like no other Nepali song that I had ever heard. Musically taut, with evocative lyrics and a voice devoid of the million cliches that encumber pop singers.

It was as if a powerful energy of extraordinary benevolence and freshness was being unleashed upon the Nepali music firmament. Bipul sang of the wild fires. Back in an innocent time when nights were not consumed by the TV or internet one could see nocturnal hills necklaced by rings of forest fires. It is perhaps a rare hill child whose memory doesn’t flicker with the leaping tongues of these orange offerings . Bipul gave a music and a voice to that memory.

The empathy clicked and the song became a phenomenon.

Then others followed. Asar with its simple jhaurey beat that mimed the stacatto monsoon on tin roofs. A song embedded with a subtle yet ominous hint of that another hill memory- the hissing of the jhora as it bounded downhill with the gurgling bounty of the monsoon waters. There was life and death in that churning.

If Dadhelo was a visual song about the memory of light, asar unpacked a sound.
The other songs that were released one after the other did not disappoint. Deorali Dadha was tactile. It caressed your face with the cool whiff of the mountain breeze. The song was a vivacious dance of hill vapours scented with the artemesia and the pine.

My personal favourite Mountain High, of Sketches of Darjeeling reminds me of Sun Ra’s Yucatan in terms of the organic vision of the composition. While the idiosyncratic minimalism of Ra evokes of mountain animals swaying as they ascend a Mayan mountain, Mountain High recreates in its sonics, the piety of monks as they blow on their horns and ascend heights that are both real and metaphorical.
Later when I heard Syndicate, I told myself this was a song screaming to be included in Sketches of Darjeeling.

Syndicate is a word that has been appropriated by us. It is seldom heard without the prefix Darjeeling or Kalimpong or Siliguri and refers to a place from where you catch a vehicle.
It is noisy and chaotic. But sometimes above the fumes of exhaust, the squabble over tickets, or the dread of having to ride on the chameray (rear) seat, soars a hope that a transient infatuation may lead on to something more meaningful.

Till one realizes sadly that the syndicate is a crossroad. It is not a point of termination but an intersection from where lives and journeys diverge.

This song has a horn interlude and a passage that speaks of ‘darkey pani,’ a sudden downpour that settles the dust and if its evening creates a luminous freshness.

It is perhaps Bipul’s genius that in these brief melodious minutes he recreates a universe that will be teeming with Darjeelingays who carry in the recesses of their minds their own episodes of Syndicate memories.

Memories that Bipul’s music has a given a fresh new color, sound and lease of life.
If Darjeeling life has a musical locus then perhaps it will follow the trajectory of a Bipul Chettri song.

P.S: What I have heard of the latest album has been promising. But this one is Bipul turning inwards…but more on this at another time.

Via TheDC

Download Bipul Chettri’s new album ‘Maya’ for free

9:28 PM
Bipul Chettri’s new album ‘Maya’ now available for free 

KATHMANDU, June 16: Those who love Bipul Chettri’s music are in for a treat! Starting Friday, June 17, fans of the musician will be able to download Chettri’s new album ‘Maya’ for free.

All the eight songs from ‘Maya’ will be available free of charge through Honda Nepal’s social media channels. One new song will be made available each week over the course of the next couple of weeks.

One of the songs from the new album is ‘Syndicate’ which has already enjoyed huge popularity since it was released as a single last year.

This is not all for Chettri’s fans. Honda Nepal is also introducing ‘Bipul Chettri Cover Song Contest’ which is an interesting platform for fans to show their talent as well as their admiration for the musician. Anyone can participate by covering his songs and then uploading it to the contest channel. The best cover will be selected by the musician himself as well as representatives from Honda.
Download Bipul Chettri’s new album ‘Maya’ for free
Download Bipul Chettri’s new album ‘Maya’ for free
The winner will receive a cash prize of Rs 100,000 and also get the opportunity to meet the singer.

Chettri says, “This album has been in the making for the past two years and has been a fun project. I would like to thank Honda Nepal for partnering with us. In the current scenario of piracy and distribution problems, I think this is one of the most innovative ways to spread the music.”

Visit faceboook.com/hondanepal to download songs from ‘Maya’ and participate in the ‘Bipul Chettri Cover Song Contest.’

1. Siriri - the first single from Bipul Chettri's Maya Just click this link http://goo.gl/DD8ato and then CREATE AN ACCOUNT to download Siriri
2 Allarey Jovan Click on http://goo.gl/DD8ato and just Log in to download the song if you have already created an account.

If you haven't created an account, please create one to listen and to download songs for Free.

Via myrepublica

Syndicate Bipul Chettri video guitar Lesson, chords and lyrics - Maya

9:21 PM
Syndicate is a song from Bipul Chettri second album Maya. The song is a simple story of two ordinary people sharing a public space and the individual fantasy world we sometimes enjoy ourselves to be in. Syndicate has already enjoyed huge popularity since it was released as a single last year.

TABBED BY: Pravesh

GUITAR TUNING: STANDARD

CAPO ON 4th FRET

Strumming pattern: D UUD UUD DU (listen to the song for the tempo)

CHORDS:
C G Am F Em Dm

If you do not have capo, you can substitute
C G Am  F Em  Dm  by
E B C#m A G#m F#m respectively

[Verse 1]

C
Bheta bhayo aja hami, Syndicate ko Maajha hami
C                                          G    
Uvechu timro bagal ma, busy timi mobile ma herechu
Am
Kheleko yowan
C
Naam timro thaha chhaina, tara malai parwa chhaina
C                                             G    
Boli kei rahechau hai aankha le kehi bhanirahechau hai
G         Am  
Bolu ta k bhanera
                Dm     F
Dar pani lagcha sochera
F                    Em               C
Timi jaane siligudi, Ma jaane sikkima tira


[Verse 2]

C
Khusi chu hai timrai majha bhule sara sansar aja
C                                       G
timi paani ma sanga nai jaane bhae kati ramailo
Am
hune thyo bhanna ta
C
Kasto yo milan hamro bis minute ko sambhandha hamro
C                                              G
payera paani napae jasto chinera paani nachine jasto
G                  Am
Jindagi yestai nai ho ra
Am                   Dm      
Aafnai bato ta jaanu chandai chha ra
F                   Em             C
Timi jaane siligudi ma jane sikkim tira

[Interlude]

C F C G  x4

[Verse 3]

Am                   F      C
Malai nai here jasto lagcha ghari ghari
G        
Here lagcha ghari ghari
Am                    F    C
Farki herchu ma paani aasa saari
G
Aasa saari
Am                 F       C
Mana ma sochdai ma ramauda chu
G
Mana ma sochdai ramauda chu
Am                 F       C
Timi sangai bhaeko kalpana garchu
G
kalpana garchu

[Interlude]

C C C C

[Verse 4]

C                  
Kasto darke paani paryo bhijera ma chura bhae
C                                           G
timi sangai ota laagi aafno gaadi parkhi ma rahe
                Am
Bhijechu aja ma rahara le
C
Saba gaadi chalna thalyo commander ko horn suni
C                                     G
Kalebung to siligudi, hana timi kasto nisthuri
              Am
chodera gayau kata tira
Am                  Dm
chadi rakhyau malai etai tira
F                   Em              C
Timi jaane siligudi ma jane sikkima tira

Syndicate - Guitar Lesson by Nepali E-Chords



Syndicate lyrics in Nepali
भेट भयो आज हामी सिन्डिकेट्को माझ हामी
उभिएछु तिम्रो बगल मा, बिजि तिमी मोबाइल मा हेरेछु
खेलेको योवन,

नाम तिम्रो थाहा छैन तर मलाई पर्वाहा छैन
बोली केही रहेछौ है, आँखाले केही भनिरहेछौ है
बोलु त के भनेर
डर पनि लाग्छ सोचेर

तिमी जाने सिलिगुरि, म जाने सिक्किम तिर

खुसी छु है तिम्रै माझ भुले सारा संसार आज
तिमी पनि म संग नै जान भए कति रमाइलो
हुने थियो भन्नत

कस्तो यो मिलन हाम्रो, बीस मिनेट को सम्बन्ध हाम्रो
पाएर पनि नपाए जस्तो, चिनेर पनि न चिने जस्तो
जिन्दगी यस्तै नै हो र
आफ्नै बाटो त जानू छदै छर

तिमी जाने सिलिगुरि, म जाने सिक्किम तिर

मलाई नै हेरेको झै लाग्छ घरी घरि
(हेरे लाग्छ घरिघरि)
फर्की हेर्छु म पनि आशा सरि
(हुउ... आशा सरि)
मनमा सोच्दै म रमाउद छु
(मनमा सोच्दै म रमाउद छु)
तिमी संगै भएको कल्पना गर्छु
(कल्पना गर्छुउ...)

कस्तो धर्के पानी पर्यो, भिजेर म चुर भए
तिमी संगै ओत लागि आफ्नो गाडी पर्खिरहे
भिजेछु आज म रहर ले

सबै गाडी चद्न थाल्यो कमाण्डर को हर्न सुनी
कलिम्पोङ टु सिलिगुरि, भन तिमी कस्तो निस्ठुरी
चडेर गयो कता तिर
छाडी राख्यौ मलाई यतै तिर
तिमी जाने सिलिगुरि, म जाने सिक्किम तिर
तिमी जाने सिलिगुरि, म जाने सिक्किम तिर
तिमी जाने सिलिगुरि, म जाने सिक्किम तिर

Master Mitrasen Thapa (1895 -1946) Gorkha in Indian and Nepal postal stamps

8:20 PM
Master Mitrasen Thapa Magar (1895 -1946)  (Nepali/नेपाली: मित्रसेन थापा मगर (१८१५ – १९४६)) Indian Gorkha folk singer, lyrics writer, dramatist, social worker and a Freedom Fighter who took part in World War-I Master Mitrasen Thapa was born on the 29th December 1895 in Village Totarani, Bhagsu /Dharamshala. He was called master because in those days, the society called writers and musicians as Masters. He is the only Gorkha who has been felicitated by a postal stamp by both India and Nepal. He was concerned about the quality of the Gorkha society and his works are dedicated to the people. Besides his great talent, Master Mitrasen discovered and employed three major tools in communication to the masses.

One was humor, second, easy-to-sing and pick-up songs in melodious tunes and the third, the usage of simple Nepali householders‟ language. Thus, instead of sermonising in seriously, Mitrasen Thapa used the medium of humour, drama, singing and dance. His songs first mesmerised the audience who then continued to sing them again and again. The messages got repeated in the process. Mitrasen realised the community needed to come together and get united all across. Through his creative work in the Nepali language and travelling, Mitrasen united all Gorkhas from Nepal to Darjeeling to Punjab. Mitrasen also highlighted the weaknesses of the society which could affect the future. He wrote against extravagant living and excesses of drinking.

Master Mitrasen Thapa Magar Indian Gorkha folk singer, lyrics writer, dramatist,
social worker and a Freedom Fighter who took part in World War-I
He wrote about the upliftment of women, and also the importance of high thinking and simple living. He wrote and spread in Nepali, the messages of Gautam Buddha, Bhagvad Gita and Mahabaharata for the Nepali masses to understand and imbibe in their daily lives.. He was always concerned about the quality of the Nepali society and most of his works are dedicated to the people. Instead of sermonising in serious tunes, Mitrasen Thapa used humour, drama, singing and dance to communicate his messages. There was time when everybody from Darjeeling, Sikkim, Dehradun to Dharamshala was all singing Master Mitrasen Thapa‟s songs. This was his way of uniting them all. It is said that during his travels, he found Nepalis speaking different dialects, along with the highly Sanskritised Nepali bhasha. He realised that he had to develop a simple common man‟s Nepali language which could be understood by all. He then decided to write in simple Gorkhali, easily understood by all. Like they say the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

Lahure Ko Relimai - Master Mitrasen Thapa


Today as our society stands at crossroads, a revival of Master Mitrasen‟s works will again create the same magic. Nine of his songs are there recorded in his own voice and with his own music group. His writings have been compiled by several authors. 35 of his original Pandulipis are there. Out of which only a few have been published. A museum has been dedicated to him at his residence „Mitra Jhupro‟ in Totarani, Dharamshala /Bhagsu. The museum could do with funds and management for better care, but nevertheless it still houses his work, his costumes, his stage jewellery, his harmonium, his medals and all that he possessed in his humble life of fifty years. It is painstakingly run alone by his only daughter-in-law Smt Devkanya Devi Thapa, widow of Master Mitrsen‟s only son Late Digvijay Singh.

Her message this morning to me was “Jole Mitrasen Thapa lai prem garcha unsang yehi vinti chha.. Unko Jyot hamesha jali rahos. Yo jo mitra jhupro chha yo hamesha chamchama rahos. Ma ta aba pachharti saal ko chhu. Ekley sambhali rahu chhu. Roj Dhoopbatti jalai dinchu. Saal ma ek baari unko janam din ma sabai la khana khilai dinchu. Aru ma kya kari sakhum? ” (Those who love Master Mitrasen Thapa, should ensure that the light of the flame of his work continues)

Extracts translated from some of the books written on Master Mitrasen Thapa

1) Mitrasen: A monograph by Magan Pathik on the Nepali author. Sahitya Academy, New Delhi (1994). First edition 1989. Second edition 1994. Amongst the many Gorkhas who made major contributions to Gorkha society was Master Mitrasen Thapa. Magan „Pathik‟of Dharamshala in his Bhartiya Sahitya Academy published book „Mitrasen‟, hails Mitrasen‟s lifetime as the golden period of Indian Nepali literature history. During this time, the country was astir with spiritual, social and political thinking. After the contributions of Vivekananda, Ramtirth and Lokmanya Tilak, great men like Gandhi‟s non-violence Satyagraha made a major impact on people. These great people were very inspiring to the people.

Rabindranth Tagore, Saratchandra, Jayshankar Prasad, Maithilisharan, Premchand, Dr Iqbal, Hasrat Muradabadi, Akbar Illhabadi and Josh Malihabadi, etc are considered the blessings of this time period, to the world of literature in the languages of Bangla, Hindi and Urdu. During that time the writers of the Nepali language included Dharnidhar Sharma, Surya Vikram Gewali, Paras Mani Pradhan, Thakur Chandra Singh, Bahadur Singh Baral and

2) Master Mitrasen ko Sanchhipt Parichay by Trilok Singh Thapa Magar, Master Mitrasen Thapa Smriti Pratisthan, Kathmandu. Family background: Enriched with Multitalented virtuoso, Master Mitra Thapa Magar was born on 29th December 1895 in India, Himachal Pradesh, Kangra District, Bhagsu Dharamshala, village Dhaarakhola. He is a Sijali Magar. His original home is from Western Nepal, earlier Banglung (now Parbat zilla), and Rakhupulla village. It is said that his grandfather Santsen Thapa (Santu Thapa) in the 18th century, came via Kumaon, Garhwal and Dehradun, to Bhagsu.

After military commander Amar Singh Thapa returned to Nepal, many Gorkhali soldiers settled near the Kangra fort area. Here was born Manver Sen Thapa Magar. Mitrasen was the son of Manversen Thapa and Radha Thapa. Despite born and brought up in India, Mitrasen has made great contribution to Nepal and Nepali language through his literature, folksongs, folk theatre, and folk lore. In 1936, he started wearing Nepali daura suruwal to create awareness of the Nepali dress. He was a great writer, director, actor, singer and producer. Nepali theatre and diary writing, humour and travel writing Mitrasen‟s contribution have been hailed as immortal.

Brief life history:
Master Mitrasen studied till class 8 in the Urdu medium as was the medium then in the Himachal schools. At a young age he also learnt music. From 1912 till 1920, he joined the 1st/1st Gorkha Rifles as per family tradition. During the 1st World War he was engaged in operations in Europe and Africa. The war‟s blood, gore, violence and hatred touched his soft heart. He entertained them with hare, rode, swarthy, Baja, chudka, played with his harmonium. Maruni dance, Phusungay dance, Horitakko phaag-dance. Being of creative bend, he was not much interested in his signalling work.

In 1914, he went with his troops to France and reached the island of St Marseilles. After one year, his troops reached Mesopotamia. There they fought against the Turk army for three years (1916-18). In the WW, lakhs of people died. Lakhs of people got injured. They included many of his friends. Therefore on returning from abroad, he resigned from the army in 1920. After that he devoted himself completely to the spread of the Nepali language through the mediums of plays, story writing, drama performances, social reforms and spread of dharma for the next 24 years of his life.

Nepal Tour In 1933-35
Mitrasen undertook a long tour of Nepal and different parts of India. First he reached his family home in Nepal at Banglung. After seeing the social condition there his work is seen to have veered towards jaati sudhaar and social reformation. Towards the end of 1933, he travelled through Palpa, Gulmi and Kathmandu. With a troupe of six members he presented his prowess in drama. Then he took the same troupe and reached Calcutta. There he recorded his plays “Dhuv” “Draupadi Charitraharan” on gramophone. In 1936, while touring Kathmandu, he advised Master Ratnadas and Melva Devi that music should have Nepaliness. His last trip to Nepal was in year 1944.

At that time Folk Theatre In 1936, Master Mitrasen established the Himalayan Theatrical Company. He performed in Hindi, Urdu and Nepali plays and earned name and fame. In Nepali language, his famous unrecorded plays are „Satyawadi Raja Harishchandra (8 parts), „Satyavaan Savitri‟, etc. In Hindi and Urdu, his works include plays „Badshah Tower‟, „Darde Jigar‟, „Noor kin Putli‟, „Mashoor ki Hoor‟, etc.

Nepali Folk songs He performed in the Kathmandu‟s durbar plays, dramas, songs and shamans. He was highly felicitated for the same.

Gramophone Disc Records (Recorded in Calcutta) 
1) Malai khukrukkay paryo jethan timro bahini le.
2) Dhaan ko Bala jhulyo hazoor deshei ramailo
3) Lahureko reli ma pheshun ramrod
4) Aba ta jau kanchhi ghara, baato chha Ukali Ourahli
5) Bhana Gorkhali Daju bhai Jai Gorkhali
6) Swami na jao chhari bidesh
7) Kina garchha tanataani dui din ko chha jindagani
8) Chui chui chukiney jootta
9) Chhatre topi dhalkai dhalkayi khukri chamkayi Out of his 63 songs, only 23 have been recorded.

In 1942, he wrote the „Buddhvaani‟ in Nepali language to spread the message of the

Buddha in a simple language. From 1940 till 1944, he wrote in Nepali, „Tirth Yatra‟, „Dharma Chhora‟, „Premma Bhagwan‟, „Teen Kura‟, „Teen Yogi‟, etc. „Premma Bhagwan‟ 3) Mitra ko Diary This edition contains Epics „Mahabharat ko Prahlad‟, „Parshuram Lakshman Samvad (73 lines)‟, „Bhakt Prahlad (702 lines), „Chandra Haas (107 lines), „Veer Abhimanyu (1120 lines), etc. For women‟s emancipation he wrote „Ekadashi Vratkatha (142 lines)‟, „Satyanarayan Katha (245 lines)‟, „Vitwamagal (1760 lines)‟, „Chandra hans (170 lines) and „Sant Sukhvai (330 lines), etc

Song writing: Master Mitrasen wrote his songs in a simple language which would reach the Gorkhali masses.
For example: “Rajya Sukh bhog Nimti Phaaakeyma, yudh rachaune kina? Mero manle mandayina, Krishna sansar dubauna kina? Duniyalai kasth, dukh diyara garib ko ragat choosera Jansamuhlai masera mauz urauna kina?” Mahabharat In 1934-37 he wrote from the Mahabharat „Aadiparva‟, „Sabhaparva‟, „Viraat parrva‟, „Udyog parva‟in Nepali. 4) Buddha Baani by Master Mitrasen Thapa This book was published in 1996 by the Mitrasen Sahitya Sangeet Sabha, Bhagsu, Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, India with foreword by His Holiness.

( by Jyoti Thapa Mani)


Adwiti interviews Bipul Chettri - a sneak peek of his new album “MAYA”

11:00 AM
ADWITI IN CONVERSATION WITH BIPUL CHETTRI

“MAYA” is the name of his new album. The infectious main riff of his songs chants nostalgia, the sound of his voice sends us all into pangs of desperate homesickness. By now you know who I am talking about. Bipul Chettri needs no introduction. His fans across the globe have been waiting with bated breath for the next set of tear-jerking, addictive Himalayan folk songs that tug at every Gorkhali’s heartstrings.

Don’t miss a single word as Adwiti Subba Haffner interviews the chappal wearing, folk song singing, homesickness inducing, our very own humility toting, Bipul Chettri for a down-to-earth interview where he opens up about his creative process, offers his insights on songwriting, his opinion on where Gorkhali music is heading towards, the latest controversy on plagiarism, what it takes to be a “skilled musician” and about how he maintains his “zen” like calm through his musical voyage.
Bipul Chettri's new album “MAYA”
Bipul Chettri Photo credit: Sonam Tashi
ADWITI: “It takes 10 years to become an overnight success” Robin Sharma. 
You rattled the airwaves with your soulful voice, your music and captured the hearts of millions of Nepali speaking population all over the world. Besides being a good singer and having great discipline, what skills/personal attributes is most important to being a successful musician?

BIPUL: Thank you. For me, it was more like 15. (smiles) I prefer to use the word, ‘skilled’ musician rather than a successful one. There are some successful artistes in this industry without great skill as well who become famous overnight and disappear in as much time. I wish there was a recipe for success though. And I can only speak for myself when I say that being proficient at what you choose to do is one of the few attributes that will help in the long run. At the end of the day, it is all done through years and years of practicing while trying to perfect ones art. And it is a never-ending learning process.

ADWITI: From small town, sleepy Kalimpong to Delhi and now performing all over the world, did you dream that your voice and your music would take you places? In an interview you have mentioned that “success” is a subjective word. What is your idea of success?

BIPUL: Never in my wildest dreams! For the longest of time, all I wanted was to become was a classical guitar soloist, and then ‘Wildfire’ happened. Success for me is subjective as every single person has his own standard of the bar being raised and scaled at. Some might just be happy with being a recluse, or some might just want a lot of fame. Money and fame are just numbers at the end of the day and is temporary. For me, success means leaving a body of work behind which people would not mind listening to in 20-30 years from now.

ADWITI: There has been a lot of Bollywood/Hollywood/Western Rock culture that has influenced and infiltrated the music of our region. Where in your opinion is our music (Gorkhali/Nepali music) collectively heading?

BIPUL: From the time, the radio, television and the Internet entered our lives; this infiltration was bound to happen one way or the other. But I also feel that this influence has been the cornerstone of Nepali music having survived in whatever forms it has till now. The whole of the 70s and early 80s was deeply influenced by the Ghazal genre and then rock music started making inroads into the Nepali music scene while folk music has always been there but mostly relegated to the background. But I think there is a sort of mini revival taking place in this area with some good artistes coming through and I think it can only get better in the coming days.

ADWITI: Apart from being a singer/songwriter you are currently the head of the Arts Department in Vasant Valley School, a leading school in India. Given your career success, can you share some advice for struggling musicians, to help them keep moving forward?

BIPUL: I have only been in the Nepali music scene for less than two years, so it would be naïve of me to start giving advice. But all I can say is that keep doing what you enjoy doing. Make music for yourself first rather than the world. If the world likes what you produce, good for you, if they don’t, it really does not matter, as long as you are happy with it. And most importantly, stay humble to your roots.

ADWITI: In our society, can an aspiring musician solely survive on her/his art without the support of an actual or a part/time job? If not. Why?

BIPUL: This is a very difficult question to answer. Most artists are constantly struggling to have their voices heard and their music played and to get paid. There are a lot of musicians doing only music and living their life and I have the greatest of respect for such people as I still think it is difficult to manage in the current scenario especially in our part of the world. One only has to applaud their commitment to trying to earn a decent livelihood in this kind of difficult scenario. But I am certain it can only get better in the long run.

ADWITI: Bipul Chettri is a sensation and very few people from our neck of the woods have not heard of you. For some who have never listened to your music, can you explain your sound in 6 words?

BIPUL: Everyone has their own interpretation of their music. For me, it has to be, ‘The Himalayan Pahari Feeling of Nostalgia’. (smiles)

ADWITI: You are aware that you have multi-cultural fans all around the world, some even look for inspiration from you and your music. Will you sing in any other language besides Nepali? 

BIPUL: I guess I will eventually, but no plans at the moment. Although one of the first original tunes I wrote, ‘Samsara’ was in English, but including it in an album is still an iffy.

ADWITI: You have traveled in many countries since the release of your Debut album “Sketches of Darjeeling”. Can you share with us your favorite memory or experience so far?

BIPUL: There have been so many. One of the best feelings is the large number of people attending our gigs and singing our songs with us during the live shows. The next thing would certainly be the number of lovely people we met during our travels. Everywhere we have performed, from the event organisers to the audience, have been wonderful to us and have treated us like family.

ADWITI: What five artists/songs would I see on your recent playlist?

BIPUL: I honestly don’t have a playlist. “Ghar ma buri ko playlist matrai baj cha”.

ADWITI: Your music gives us a reason to congregate and interact in an environment of joy, nostalgia and celebration. You have a new album coming up, set to hopefully conquer the airwaves again. What is the name of the album? What is the release date? 

BIPUL: Thank you. The new album is ready and sounding good if I may say so myself. The album is called ‘Maya’ and we hope to release it soon. We are trying to tie up a few loose ends after which we will have a release date. We also have a very big surprise coming with it too. So stay tuned.

ADWITI: You are also known for your innovative, experimental way of creating music. What can your eager fans anticipate from your next album that is different from your previous one? 

BIPUL: There is bound to be pre-conceived notions about the sound of the album as people have been used to listening to ‘Sketches of Darjeeling’. The only difference this time around is that most of the songs from this album were written, developed and honed on the road, as you would have noticed from the ‘Soundcheck Series’ on our YouTube page. I have had so many influences, be it in writing/arranging and it has been a fun album to make.

ADWITI: Can you give us a sneak peek? 

BIPUL: There are 8 songs in this album along with ‘Syndicate’ which was released as a Single earlier is also a part of it. All the songs, except for ‘Kahiley Kahi’ are written by me. Kahiley Kahi is a special song because my father recorded (if I am not mistaken) this somewhere in the very early 70s at the British Forces Broadcasting Station while he was serving in the British Army. A colleague and friend of my father sent me this recording and I felt it needed to re-record and heard by the public as well. It has a very Bossa nova feel to it, which was very rare for a Nepali song to sound like that then. I have kept the lyrics and melody as close to the original and am very happy with the final outcome. ‘Junkeri’ and ‘Nau Lakhey Tara’ are acoustically driven while the rest of the songs are with the complete band.

ADWITI: Your songs have a level of depth and intrigue that make people sit up and notice you right away. Could you please share with us the creative process of your new album? Starting from the concept, the people/work/marketing/promotion/expectations involved.

BIPUL: I started writing for this album without any concept as such. The first one I wrote was ‘Syndicate’ and some others thereafter. I figured that most of the tunes were heading towards ‘love’ in the sense of it being real or an illusion for some, being the central or peripheral theme without being conscious while writing about it. But the ‘pahari’ element in the music will always be prevalent in our music.

I don’t have a process of writing as such. Sometimes, the riff/melody comes before the lyrics or vice versa. ‘Syndicate’ was one of the songs where the lyrics came first and the melody/arrangement later. I had initially planned to record it acoustically with just the guitar and a harmonica, but changed it considerably midway as I thought it justified a much larger sound. I also had a fantastic set of musicians in the band to help me achieve that particular sound which I was looking for.

Our Manager looks after all the marketing/promotions so I really don’t know much about that part of the story. I just make the music. (Smiles) But I do know that since we are independent musicians, without any label backing us, we have to lean mostly towards word-of-mouth and online social platforms to help our music get some form of mileage. As far as expectation goes, I have a theory as I mentioned earlier, that I make music for myself first. If the audience also enjoys it along the way, that is a bonus.

ADWITI: Can you please give us an idea as to what happened with the recent plagiarizing attempt by a certain Bollywood music producer who ripped off the main riff of one of your compositions? I believe something similar was experienced by our famous "Musu musu hasee dewna" song. 

BIPUL: I was actually in Kalimpong when all this happened and had no clue until our Manager informed me about it. The said tune had the same guitar riff used in Asaar throughout their composition as well which made it sound alike. Our Manager got in touch with the concerned people in Mumbai and sorted it out after which they removed the track and offered to redo it. So it all ended well. But this is nothing new, especially in Bollywood as you all know. All one can do is to be alert and try and sort it out as amicably as possible. Of course, one can take further action, if they don't agree with your claim, which thankfully we did not have to resort to.

ADWITI: Who alerted your team of this situation? 

BIPUL: There were tons of messages from fans on our Face book page with the link.

ADWITI: This is definitely a “teachable or a learnable moment” for artists? How can they protect themselves from being blatantly plagiarized? 

BIPUL: Well... In India you can go to this address http://copyright.gov.in and register your songs or music. I think they charge about Rs. 2000 per song if I am not mistaken. It is essential to safeguard your creations if you intend to keep your Intellectual Property with you.

ADWITI: I believe most of your audience love old/classic Gorkhali/Nepali songs. What can we all do for the curation of our cultural and musical heritage?

BIPUL: All of us love and cherish the past legacy of Nepali music. It is what has helped us get to the point where we are at the moment. I sincerely don’t have a specific answer to this question for the general public but I can only speak for myself when I say that I will keep making the kind of music that I am making and hope it helps in some way preserve some form of it. It would be too audacious to say that I am trying to deliberately help in saving this art form, as there are so many others who are doing much more. But do try and keep listening to our homegrown music is all I can say.

ADWITI: How do you maintain your “Zen” like balance and authentic humility while experiencing your level of recognition and success? 

BIPUL: I think I got myself into the public limelight a little later in life than most musicians did. So I think coming into the scene a little late helped in not giving in too much to the hype that most of the newcomers usually face in this industry. I am also by the end of the day, just a simple music teacher in a school and nothing more than that.

ADWITI: What next for Bipul Chettri? The poet/the singer/the songwriter/the musician/the artist.

BIPUL: I think you are being too kind. Like I said, I write my music with whatever little I know of the language and the art. I just hope to get better and learn from all the experiences that I will face in the coming years.

Some time ago I was chatting with a friend about how we, Darjeelingeys have such a great sense of humor and how our gatherings are always filled with music and impromptu witty exchanges that we temporarily forget all our sorrows and setbacks. She said “my perception of humor is that a person who makes people laugh are doing what we Tibetans call "gewa" as for a few minutes they make people forget their sorrows or pains and have a good laugh, without realizing they make people happy”.

This particular word “gewa” or the meaning thereof comes to my mind when I listen to Bipul Chettri’s music. He is servicing us, the listeners with a nostalgic sliver of our hometown. His music, his songs and his voice has the powerful ability to connect us directly to our emotions and our lives back home - the place where we belong no matter how far we go.

Thank you Bipul Chettri for the “gewa”, for providing us with the experience of being home without actually being there. We wish “ Maya” to reach far and wide, to make more people happy and for you to feel fulfilled and rewarded with more songs that remind us of “home ...calling...home”.

[Adwiti Subba Haffner is an entrepreneur, social worker, writer, freelance journalist, world traveler, mother, wife, yoga/meditation teacher. You can find her at https://web.facebook.com/AdwitiHaffner and her website is www.alivewithadwiti.com]


 
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