Showing posts with label sports news. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sports news. Show all posts

Sachin Tendulkar's encouragement words for Shiva Thapa

10:17 PM
23rd June 2016 The lone Indian boxer to have qualified for 2016 Rio Olympics so far, Shiva Thapa have received a vedio where Sachin Tendulkar have some supporting words for him in the popular social media. The post read "It is the biggest experience ever for any athlete to represent their nation at Olympics".A huge shout out to Shiva Thapa on his ‪#‎RoadtoRio‬. Jee jaan laga dena!"  ‪#‎AgainstAllOdds‬ Indian Olympic Association. India had gone with a 13-member squad and only Shiva qualified for the Olympics so far.

In a reaction to this gesture from the God of Cricket Shiva replied "Thank you Sir for your motivating words." This is the second time that Sachin have actually made a video for Shiva Thapa. The first time Sachin made video for Shiva was when  he replied to a question asked by Thapa in a Twitter chat, wished the 22-year-old the very best for his second Olympics. “Firstly, all the very best for the Rio Olympics. We are with you. We are supporting you. Don’t think about the pressure. Just think about the process, results will follow,” said Tendulkar (Details here Sachin Tendulkar wishes Shiva Thapa good luck for Rio Olympics 2016 )

Watch the video
In the time when boxing in India has been facing a lot of problems with the lack of a federation these words from Sachin have come as a ray of hope.



Shiva Thapa's interview about training and his hopes for Rio.

4:38 PM
In boxing, aggression is key: Shiva Thapa - the only Indian boxer to have qualified for the Rio Games so far, on his preparations and the unending chaos in the sport’s administration.
Writes Suprita Das*

New Delhi: Four years ago, he became the youngest Indian boxer to qualify for the Olympic Games. Now, Shiva Thapa, 22, says he’s grown as a boxer, despite the sport itself having stalled in India in the worst possible way over the lack of a governing body. In late 2012, the international ruling body for amateur boxing, AIBA, banned the Indian boxing federation after finding evidence of a rigged election. Ever since, Indian boxing’s administrators have been at war with each other, and the ban has stayed. The worst affected, of course, have been the boxers. There have been no national championships since 2012, the training calendar and camps for elite boxers have been thrown out of gear, and boxers have found it increasingly difficult to participate in international tournaments without a federation to represent them.

In 2012, an unprecedented eight boxers qualified for the London Olympics. This year, with just two chances left to qualify (one tournament is ongoing, the other is meant for pro boxers), Thapa is the only Indian boxer who has assured himself of a place in Rio 2016.
Thapa is the only Indian boxer who has assured himself of a place in Rio 2016.
Shive Thapa is the only Indian boxer who has assured himself of a place in Rio 2016.
The bantamweight (56kg) boxer from Assam, currently ranked No. 6 in the world, spoke in an interview about training through adversity, and his hopes for Rio.

Edited excerpts:

You’re the first and so far the only Indian boxer to have qualified for Rio. Isn’t it going to be a bit of a lonely dressing room for you?
Yes, if nobody else qualifies, it will be a little lonely, no doubt. But I am hopeful our boys have one more chance of qualifying for Rio. Vikas (Krishan Yadav) has given himself one more shot at qualifying through the AIBA pro boxing route, and I am definitely hopeful about him.

You were the youngest Indian to qualify for London four years back. How have you grown as a boxer?
A lot. I am a different person, and a better boxer for sure. When I made the cut for London, it was a dream come true. But it got over in a flash. The last four years have been spent in making myself tougher, and better. The Olympics are always a huge occasion, there is so much more we attach to it than just the competition, and any of us who have qualified who says they are not nervous, are not telling the truth.

But the experience I gained last time, I’m sure that will help. I hope it’s going to be less overwhelming. I have now taken part in two World Championships, two Asian Championships, one Olympics, one Asian Games and one Commonwealth Games—I have fought against many different opponents, which has taken my boxing to a higher level. There is a lot more self-belief in me than before. And the big stage and the spotlight does not makes me nervous.

You were just 18 when you qualified for London. What was that like?
Yes, it’s actually the scenes in my home town, Guwahati, after my qualification, that I will never forget. The road near our house was lined with cars, and people, and members of the media. For days my parents, my sister, they couldn’t do anything normally. That’s why before a big tournament I always try and make a trip back home to see my family. I’ve done it this time too. I just switch off during those days, and don’t even check my phone.

And this time, after your qualified, you posed a question to Sachin Tendulkar on Twitter...

Yes, I am a massive fan of Tendulkar, and he’s played for India in so many World Cups. So I was keen to know how the best sportspersons handle pressure at that level.

And what was Tendulkar’s advice?
He said you shouldn’t think of the outcome, but focus on the process instead. He said that the pressure will always be there, but the idea is to just enjoy the moment, enjoy being on such a big stage like the Olympics, and when you begin to enjoy yourself, the pressure takes care of itself.

You say you’ve become a better boxer. How has that happened given the mess Indian boxing is in?
It’s been frustrating, and disappointing, no doubt. That’s why when I won my Olympic quota in China, it was more like overcoming a huge mental battle. I let out a scream after my semi-final, because I was relieved. In a way, you could say there was that pent-up anger inside me, and I wanted to come out strong despite the huge administrative barriers that, not just me, all of us faced.

During the trials for the Olympic qualifiers, you got a cut above your eye, which means just before the competition, you couldn’t even have sparring sessions. Did that make it even tougher?
Yes, it’s like going to write an exam without preparing for it! I needed stitches for the injury, and then couldn’t spar with anyone for fear that the cut would open. At that time all my training and sparring was in the head.

You realize there could be a scenario where you could be competing in Rio as an International Olympic Committee or an AIBA athlete, and not on behalf of India?

Yes, I hope it’s sorted before that. I know they are making efforts in that direction. We have been competing as AIBA athletes for these two years, and of course it’s very odd to not have anything written on my vest or jacket when I am competing. Sometimes when you’re not in the ring, but somewhere around the competition venue, people come and ask you which country you’re from, and that reminds you of the reality.

What’s been the biggest hurdle in training because of the federation ban for so long?
Getting more tournaments and exposure trips, definitely. See, so much of the scoring and judging in boxing has become subjective, and you can’t do much beyond what the judge has put on his scoresheet. But we have hardly got a chance to compete under these new rules. In Patiala (at the national training camp), we may have the best sparring partners, but anyone will tell you that training and competition are completely different.

So, for example, I have been working on increasing my aggression. In today’s boxing, I think, there is no place for dormant boxers who like to back-pedal and move around the ring without the intent to throw punches and score points. Aggression is key; you don’t have any option but to go for the kill. But it’s only when I am fighting a real bout in a competition that I will be able to judge if my aggression is in the right measure, or am I going overboard.

Every bout, and every competitor, is different. There can be no formula obviously. So getting more competitions makes a huge difference. Still I would say, AIBA has been quite generous and understanding with India; it could have been far worse, we could have been banned from competing completely.

What do you make of Vijender Singh turning pro?
It’s interesting times no doubt, with the road to pro boxing in our country being paved by Vijender who has been a game changer in amateur boxing for us, and now in pro too. I think it opens many doors for boxers, especially younger boxers. Our boys have been going through uncertain times, so they are going to lap up any opportunity. If you look at any other sports, even in India itself, the coaches have been working and training and identifying youngsters for the 2020 Olympics now, and that’s how it must be. But in boxing we don’t have that, because where are the competitions to identify new boxers?

Given a chance, would you be tempted to turn pro? You definitely have age on your side.
I don’t want to predict right now, because there’s nothing else that’s on my target at the moment apart from Rio. I have worked very hard to get my ticket, I have earned it, and want to make the most of it. Any decision on the future is for a later time.

*Suprita Das is a senior sports correspondent with NDTV.

Via livemint

Anirudh Thapa captain of the Indian National Football Team (Under-19)

8:45 AM
After Sunil Chettri, here's our own Anirudh Thapa, born on 15th January 1998 in Uttarakhand, has given us more reason to watch and follow football, the most followed sport by our community, ever closely. The captain of the Indian National Football Team (Under-19) Thapa came into the spotlight when India defeated hosts Nepal to win the U-16 SAFF Championship. Anirudh Thapa is a talented midfielder whose dribbling and passing skills are a treat for the eyes.

He did his schooling from St. Stephen's in Chandigarh. This is where he started playing football at the age of 10. The 18-year-old comes from Dehradun in Uttarakhand and is currently plying his trade at the AIFF Elite Academy based in Goa.
Anirudh Thapa captain of the Indian National Football Team (Under-19)
Anirudh Thapa
Thapa joined the AIFF academy in Kalyani in 2012. He was also integrated in the India U15 squad in the same year.

In 2013, Thapa won the SAFF U16 Championship. He also participated in the AFC U16 Championship where he scored once in four appearances.

The attacking midfielder went to Malaysia to compete in the Asia U16 Championship in 2014.

In 2015, Thapa was the youngest member selected to be part of the India U19 squad who were runners-up in SAFF U19 Championship. Thapa scored twice in four matches in the competition.

He won the U19 I-league in 2015-2016 season when he captained the AIFF Elite Academy. He played 14 games and notched up three goals.

Thapa's family backs him to the hilt.

Football is his love, he eventually sees his growth in the world's most followed sport. Aspiring to become one of the best, he continues to dream to play for the national team in the foreseeable future.

Darjeeling Everest girls Trishala & Suloxchana to get grand homecoming reception

3:12 PM
Report by Swareena Gurung

DARJEELING 13 Jun 2016 The Gorkhaland Territorial Administration (GTA) has planned a grand homecoming reception for Everest climbers Trishala Gurung and Suloxchana Tamang who will be arriving at Bagdogra airport from Delhi on June 15. The two girls from Darjeeling  scaled the world's highest mountain on May 21.

GTA Information and Cultural Department executive member Binay Tamang has requested members of all castes and communities including students to welcome the two climbers right from Siliguri all the way to Darjeeling by forming groups in several vantage places. Gurung and Tamang will be felicitated at a programme to be organised at the Gorkha Rangamanch Bhawan.


Everest climbers Trishala Gurung and Suloxchana Tamang from Darjeeling
From right Everest climbers Trishala Gurung and Suloxchana Tamang from Darjeeling
The chairmen of the four municipalities of Darjeeling, Mirik, Kalimpong and Kurseong will be present along with GTA and Gorkha Janmukti Morcha members. GJM president Bimal Gurung will  address the function. The climbers will also be rewarded with citizen felicitations on Independence Day in recognition of their praiseworthy feat.


Via EOI

Why I won’t ‘settle down’ says Shiva Thapa

4:43 PM
I found the purpose and passion that keeps me on my toes when I first walked into a boxing gym.

Everyone wants to know how I’m training for the Olympics. Training for the Olympics isn’t just a matter of working hard for a few months or for four years. When I think about it, the countdown to the Olympics started when I walked into a boxing gym for the first time. I was nine years old then.
The Olympics, of course, are the biggest games in the world. As a boxer, this is supposed to be one of the highlights of my career. When I go to Rio, I think I will be able to enjoy the Olympics a lot more. When I was in London (2012), I was overawed by the whole experience. You are walking around the Olympic village or you could be having lunch and you meet some of the greatest athletes in the world. When I met athletes like Usain Bolt and Michael Phelps, I was a little apprehensive. How would they respond to an 18-year-old from India who hadn’t won anything? But they were welcoming. You could see they had the attitude of a winner but they were never rude to anyone. That’s something I took from them. Being a champion is about being open to new situations. There’s always something to learn from others.
Why I won’t ‘settle down’ says Shiva Thapa
Shiva Thapa
I also made a lot of friends at the London games. People are quick to jump to the conclusion that boxers are a violent bunch. That’s not true. All our aggression is confined to the ring. Outside, we are like a brotherhood. One of my good friends at London was Satoshi Shimizu of Japan. I had beaten him in the semifinal of the Asian Olympic qualifiers in 2012, but he had made it to the Olympics because I had won the final at the qualifiers. But at London our paths differed. I lost in the first round and he won a bronze. It wasn’t in my destiny to win a medal in London, I suppose.

But it certainly was in my destiny to be a boxer. I believe that boxing is my purpose in life. In fact, I believe everyone has a purpose in life. We sometimes confuse what we are doing with what our purpose in life is. It is not easy to find out one’s purpose in life is. People don’t know what they want to do even after they turn 30 or 40. I feel blessed and fortunate that I knew what I wanted to do with my life when I was nine.

It helped that my father did not force me into boxing. My father practiced martial arts. But he didn’t mind if I was interested in studies or singing or dancing. If my father had pushed me into the sport, I may have rebelled. I went to the gym myself and he supported me. That’s all I needed from him.
Being a native of Assam makes it sometimes an unusual experience when I travel abroad. Very often other boxers come up to me and ask if I am really from India. I explain to them that India is a large country with very many people. Since I am the only Indian who has qualified in boxing for this Olympics, I wonder if boxers from elsewhere will think that all Indians look like me!

It’s a little different when this question is posed in your own country. It is frustrating when your own countrymen say you look like a native of some other country. We have always looked like this. I know that the North East was never ruled by China or Mongolia or Korea. Judging whether someone is Indian by their face is foolish. There are people from North India who look Arab to me. At times I get a bit angry when I hear cases of discrimination. There are some who think that people from the North East are less Indian than they are. But what have they achieved to make their country proud? They probably can’t even name the seven states of the North East or spot them on the India map!
I spoke on the anti racism law because I see myself as a guy from the North East. Discussions started on that law after the murder of Nido Tania in Delhi in 2014. I was upset because the debate was around Nido’s identity — he was someone from Arunachal Pradesh. I was shocked this happened to an Indian.

People would say I’m patriotic. All athletes are in some way patriotic. When you compete for the Olympics, you have to sacrifice so much for so long. You have to train more than you thought you could. You do it because it’s for something bigger than you.

In a way I am grateful that I can do what I do. I love boxing but it also gives me a platform to represent my country on the biggest stage of all. If my achievements can motivate a youngster from my state to do well, or convince someone that people from my region are as much a part of this country as any other, that’s equally important for me.

Boxing has given me an identity. When I wear my boxing vest, it doesn’t say Shiva Thapa or Assam or the North East. It says India. I’m a boxer fighting for my country. That’s what I’m about.


Via indianexpress

Gokul Sharma Captain of Assam Cricket Ranji Team, A Gorkha Pride!!

2:25 PM
Gokul Sharma is an Indian Gorkha first-class cricketer who plays for Assam and is the Captain of Assam Cricket Ranji Team. Sharma is a right-handed middle order batsman and right-arm off break bowler. Son of Mr. Khadanand Sharma and Mrs. Dil Kumari Sharma. Studied in Model High School, Born and Brought Up in Guwahati. He is also working as an Auditor at Indian Audit & Accounts Department (C&AG of India). His Best innings is 101 against Bengal in the Ranji Trophy in 2010-11.

Full name Gokul Sharma
Born December 25, 1985, Guwahati, Assam
Current age 30 years 167 days
Major teams Assam
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak
Gokul Sharma Captain of Assam Cricket Ranji Team
Gokul Sharma Captain of Assam Cricket Ranji Team


His Interview With The Gorkha Times Assam

The Gorkha Times Assam asked him some Questions,

-How does it feels to lead the Assam Cricket Team?.
He replies, "It's an honour to lead a team like Assam which have so much of potential and believe to perform at the highest level."

-Who is your Inspiration?
He Replies, "Well in cricket I always idolise Sachin Tendulkar, the way he goes about the game and also the kind of human being he is off the field and in my life my mother is my inspiration because I saw the toughest part she faced in her life, what I really appreciate and like about my mother was the attitude and the way she handled that situation was very learning experience for me"

-His view about "The Gorkha Times Assam"?
He Replies,"I would like to thanks them for promoting cricket and showing great interest for the development of the game. The Gorkha Times Assam is doing a great work by promoting crickets or any other sports,just like to give a big thank to them and keep encouraging the sportsperson"
With this small Interview Conversation, We also came to know about the Great Human Being. We are Proud of you Sir.

You are Sachin Tendulkar for the Gorkhas of Assam. We wish you all the best for your future endeavours, We will be always there to support you.


Gorkhas Daughter wins Gold and Bronze in International Taekwondo Championship

11:07 AM
Gorkhas Daughter Sushila Sonar from Northeast India Arunachal Pradesh, who is a 4th Dan Black Belt, represented India in the above 76 kg category and has won Gold and Bronze medal in  2nd International Taekwondo championship 2016 which was held in Bhutan. Sushila Sonar won one gold and one bronze medal in Kyorugi in senior girls above 76 kg category and in Poomsae in U-39 year category.

In the event, Indian contingent comprised of 23 members. The International event was organized by Bhutan Taekwondo Federation and was sanctioned by World Taekwondo Federation.


You make our Indian Gorkha community, Northeast and country as a whole very proud!!!


 
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